Bulletins to November 2014

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Wilhelm Roentgen | Sciencelearn Hub

This article describes how German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen accidentally discovered x-rays in 1895, and the response to his invention.

histscimedtech 8 November 2014

Canadian Bulletin of Medical History / Bulletin canadien d’histoire de la médecine

The Canadian Bulletin of Medical History / Bulletin canadien d’histoire de la médecine is the official organ of the Canadian Society for the History of Medicine/ Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine and is the primary outlet in Canada for refereed

histscimedtech 8 November 2014

Birmingham Stories: The First World War | Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery

bmagblog.org - birminghammag
Birmingham Stories is a series of blog posts exploring the experiences of Birmingham men and women during the First World War through the Museum’s collection. Harold Hall Harold Hall in his RAMC Uniform, December 1914 Harold Hall was born in Woodgate on the outskirts of Birmingham in 1893. At the age of 14 he began working at Cadbury’s in the Biscuit Department. When war broke out in 1914, Harold volunteered for the Army but he was classed as unfit for military service. Harold had lost a fi…  »

histscimedtech 8 November 2014

Trapped in the House of Unity | OUPblog

I emerged after a long day in the soundproofed cabins at the back of the reading room in the onetime Institute of Marxism-Leninism, which pieces of black sticky tape now proclaimed as the ‘Institute of the Labour Movement’. It was spring 1990 and I was in East Berlin, as one of the first western researchers into the German Democratic Republic.

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

World War I and Dissent | An edit-a-thon- Eventbrite

Eventbrite – School of Advanced Study presents World War I and Dissent | An edit-a-thon – Saturday, 22 November 2014 at Senate House Library, Greater London. Find event and ticket information.

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Why Men Should Not Vote

This satire comes from Alice Duer Miller, an early 20th-century advocate of women’s suffrage. Miller was the author of  Are Women People?  Read more about her here.  (HT: Beth Pardoe)

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Silas Webb, ‘The historian and the stock market’ | Modern British Studies @ Birmingham

The History Manifesto is an attempt by its authors to emphasize, perhaps, even, reimagine, the important function that historians might perform in the 21st century. It is at once a diagnosis of the field’s missteps, as the authors characterize them, and a prognosis that implores historians to reclaim their rightful place in international governance and…

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Call for Papers: Women’s History in the Digital World 2015 | Educating Women

greenfield.blogs.brynmawr.edu - Monica L. Mercado
Women’s History in the Digital World 2015, the second conference of The Albert M. Greenfield Digital Center for the History of Women’s Education, will be held on the campus of Bryn Mawr College on May 21-22. We aim to bring together experts, novices, and all those in between to share insights, lessons, and resources for the many projects emerging at the crossroads of history, the digital humanities, and women’s and gender studies. Continuing a conversation begun at our inaugural meeting in 201…  »

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Forensics: The anatomy of crime | Wellcome Collection

‘Forensics: the anatomy of crime’ explores the history, science and art of forensic medicine. It travels from crime scene to courtroom, across centuries and continents, exploring the specialisms of those involved in the delicate processes of collecting, analysing and presenting medical evidence. It draws out the stories of victims, suspects and investigators of violent crimes, and our enduring cultural fascination with death and detection.

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

HSS at Work at the History of Science Society Annual Meeting | History of Science at Work

Planning on attending the History of Science Society Annual Meeting and interested in learning more about the alt-ac community? We have planned a number of opportunities for grad students, independent scholars, and historians of science of all kinds who are on non-academic or non-traditional academic career trajectories to mingle, talk about work, and seek a supportive community. Here’s where you can find us next week in Chicago:   Friday, November 7, 7:30-8:30pm Stop by the Great Lakes Ballr…  »

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Medical insights | JISC Digitisation and Content

The 20th century is the period in which advances in medicine and public health led to a much improved life span for the populations of developed nations. The 19th century, on the other hand, is seen as time when only the wealthy could benefit from medicine. This is perhaps an unfair assertion. To be able to verify or refute it, one would need a significant number of publications from the 19th century to hand. The UK Medical Heritage Library will provide the most comprehensive set of such public…  »

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Conference: Rethinking Modern British Studies | Modern British Studies @ Birmingham

What does it mean to do British studies today?   Modern British Studies at Birmingham was launched in February 2014 to explore new and interdisciplinary ways of thinking about British society, culture, politics, and the economy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will host our first international conference on 2-3 July 2015, and now invite scholars working…

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

CFP: Progress, change and development: past, present and future | Francophone Africa

Progress, change and development: past, present and future An international conference, to be held at University of Portsmouth, 4- 6 June 2015, with the generous support of the Centre for European …

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Viral Consumption | global-e: a global studies journal

Richard C. Keller With Ebola now on at least three continents, thoughts run to its origins. Discussion circulates around fruit bats, chimpanzees, and other primates, but no one really knows for sure where the disease’s reservoir might be, or what might serve as its vector. Perhaps what is most disturbing is that scapegoating has filled knowledge gaps left by uncertainty. Blame for the epidemic’s spread has fallen on its victims and those who have sought to provide relief in the struggle against  »

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

‘The tie that binds: popular imperialism and the Australian Scottish delegation of 1928′, International Review of Scottish Studies, Vol. 39, 2014. | Benjamin Wilkie – Academia.edu

By Benjamin Wilkie in Cultural History and Economic History. By examining the commercial and migratory connections forged between Australia and Scotland between the wars, this article extends discussions of the relationship between the Empire and the

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, August 07, 1915, 3:30 Edition, Page SIX, Image 6 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, August 07, 1915, 3:30 Edition, Page SIX, Image 6, brought to you by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Images from the Library | Medical Heritage Library

medicalheritage.org - Hanna Clutterbuck
From C.J. Cullingworth’s Clinical illustrations of the diseases of the fallopian tubes and of tubal gestation : a series of drawings with descriptive text and histories of the cases (1895). As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Old medical photographs: Are images of syphilis and tuberculosis patients history or just horror?

slate.com - Rebecca Onion
The recent book The Sick Rose: Disease and the Art of Medical Illustration is not to be leafed through lightly. The volume reproduces 19th-century images from the Wellcome Library’s collection of textbooks and medical atlases, alongside commentary by historian Richard Barnett. Some of its images of suffering patients have the power to rearrange the unsuspecting viewer physiologically, provoking nausea or painful waves of empathy. The experience of looking at The Sick Rose, which is a well-cura…  »

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Rethinking Patent Medicines | Points: The Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society

Joe Spillane recently pointed us to Caroline Rance’s blog, “The Quack Doctor,” and suggested that her posts – filled with advertisements for  things such as “Carter’s Little Liver Pills” and “Effervescent Brain Salt” –  form a “reasonable platform” for historians to “ask the larger questions about  consumer behavior, medical authority, business interests, and the role…

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Having Their Cake: Ingredients and Recipe Collecting in the Nineteenth Century | The Recipes Project

recipes.hypotheses.org - Rachel A. Snell
By Rachel A. Snell Between 1835 and 1870, Sarah L. Weld of Cambridge, Massachusetts collected twenty-three recipes for gingerbread. This repetition of recipes, particularly recipes for baked goods, was not uncommon in nineteenth-century recipe collections. In fact, it was the … Continue reading →

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

"One Great Epic Unfolding": H.G. Wells and the Interwar Debate on the Teaching of History | Osborne | Historical Studies in Education / Revue d’histoire de l’éducation

Abstract This essay explores H.G. Wells’s attempts to reform the teaching of history between the two World Wars. Holding history teachers largely responsible for creating the mood of bellicose nationalism that made the First World War possible, Wells concluded that only a fundamentally reformed history education would ensure the survival of the human species. He pressed for a global history, to be taught in all the world’s schools, that began with the origins of the universe and ended with the …  »

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Marriage, Family Life and Childhood Experience | A History of Working-Class Marriage

workingclassmarriage.gla.ac.uk - WCM Project Team
As a part of the History of Working- Class Marriage project, my PhD research is investigating the effects of marriage and family life on children in Scotland between 1920 and 1970. At this point in time there is no comprehensive history of childhood experiences in Scotland, and very little existing information on the experiences of children growing up in different family forms and circumstances. ‘Family breakdown’ is something that we are hearing more and more about, and there is increasing pol…  »

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Why Province Studies Matter – Thompson Werk

thompsonwerk.com - Robert
When I describe my research project to other scholars–often in a conference setting–I am reminded that it is difficult for the study of a single province to speak for all of South Vietnam. Some simply consider a province study as hardly representative of anything outside the province. Making the connection between one province out of forty-four and the rest of the country is a challenge, yet far from impossible. Think about the other studies of the Vietnam War and the sources used. In Working-C…  »

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

Apostles of Growth | The Nation

When Dr. William Levingston came to town, he arrived wearing a silk hat and peddling a cure for one of his age’s most terrifying ailments: uncontrollable growth. At $25, the cost was steep for the farmers and tradesmen of the rural countryside where Levingston did most of his huckstering.

twitterstorians 7 November 2014

History of photography in medicine: 19th-century uses of daguerreotypes in consultation.

During the nineteenth century, physicians used photographs as consultation tools and treated patient photographs as prized collectable objects. Southern physician Edward Archelaus Flewellen sent this daguerreotype of A.P Jackson—one of the earliest surviving consultation photographs—to the famed surgeon Valentine Mott in 1856. Flewellen had been Mott’s student in New York,…

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

FWSA Blog » Being a Woman, Being a Mother: Infertility in early modern England

fwsablog.org.uk - FWSA Blog
  by Jennifer Evans Women in early modern England were partly defined by their work, for example spinsters and midwives. Their position in the community was also established by bearing children and becoming a mother. The gathering of women around the birthing room was an opportunity to share reproductive knowledge and to become fully integrated into the circle of married women in their neighbourhood. But not all women achieved motherhood [...]

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

The Spokane press. (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, January 16, 1910, Page 13, Image 1 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The Spokane press. (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, January 16, 1910, Page 13, Image 1, brought to you by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

t. 1 – Il gabinetto del giovane naturalista / – Biodiversity Heritage Library

The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol: #20 | Whewell’s Ghost

Whewell’s Gazette Your weekly digest of all the best of Internet history of science, technology and medicine Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell Volume #20 Monday 03 November 2014 EDITORIAL: The editorial-team here at Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #HistSTM links digest tend towards the curmudgeonly end of the social spectrum so our attitude to Halloween is perfectly summed up by the following, in our opinion, wonderful photograph. Photographer unknown However the #HistSTM commun…  »

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Fantastically Wrong: History’s Most Hilarious Misconceptions About the Elephant | WIRED

wired.com - Matt Simon
Follow Wired Twitter Facebook RSS Fantastically Wrong: History’s Most Hilarious Misconceptions About the Elephant By Matt Simon 11.05.14 | 6:30 am | Edit | Permalink Share on Facebook 0 inShare jj Antiquity’s saddest elephant laments the cursive that someone wrote all over it. Wikimedia In the “Heffalumps and Woozles” ditty from Winnie the Pooh, elephants—those would be the heffalumps—wear tuxedos and use their trunks as accordions and suddenly turn blue. Fantastical, to be sure, but it’s…  »

histscimedtech 7 November 2014

Not Done Yet: Midwifing a Return to Social Birth | Nursing Clio

nursingclio.org - Carolyn Herbst Lewis
By Jordan Taitel As a doula, I have the privilege of attending other women’s labors and deliveries. Recently I attended a delivery assisted by a midwife at a large-scale hospital. The midwife and the nursing staff supported the fearless mama as she labored away in a large room with a wall of windows looking out on a beautiful river. The room was decorated with pretty pictures of flowers and soothing paint tones. Most of the medical equipment remained hidden in easy-access drawers. Everything in…  »

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Chris Moores, ‘Embracing the mess’ | Modern British Studies @ Birmingham

At times, the History Manifesto feels like the call-to-arms it claims to be: a passionate and enthusiastic case for the relevance of the past. It is refreshing to read a work which takes on big, important, political questions and makes the case that the interventions of historians matter. The notion that anyone thinking seriously about…

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Teaching Black Internationalism and Americanah

aaihs.org - Chris Cameron
The following is a guest post from Keisha N. Blain, an historian of the 20th c. United States with broad interdisciplinary interests and specializations in African American History, the modern African Diaspora, and Women’s and Gender Studies. She completed a B.A. (Magna Cum Laude; Phi Beta Kappa) in History and Africana Studies from Binghamton University (SUNY) and a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University. She is currently a postdoctoral research fellow in the Africana Research Center (ARC)…  »

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Juvenile Instructor » Return to Elkton

This post comes out of my experiences this fall teaching a senior seminar on “Writing Recent History” (which my students are finding especially challenging), and thinking about what that might mean in the Mormon context. And it’s also prompted by something that Laurel Thatcher Ulrich said about Claudia Bushman at the Exponent II 40th celebration last month that caught my ear and which I’ve been thinking about ever since. Laurel said that one of the motivations for starting the journal was Claud…  »

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Keep the Candle Burning

UCL Department of Science and Technology Studies is unique. Award-winning teaching and public engagement. We combine history and philosophy of science, science policy and governance, and science communication and engagement. Offering degrees at all levels.

histscimedtech 6 November 2014

Hermione Hobhouse – obituary – Telegraph

telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph Staff
Architectural historian and biographer of Thomas Cubitt who chronicled the destruction of much-loved London landmarks

histscimedtech 6 November 2014

Register now for the “Connected Histories of Decolonisation” workshop | Francophone Africa

francophone.port.ac.uk - UoP Francophone
Connected Histories of Decolonisation   A two-day workshop organised by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies in conjunction with the Centre for European and International Studies Research at the University of Portsmouth and King’s College London The Senate Room, Senate House (First Floor) Register for this event online at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies website. ***  Thursday 13th November 2014   11-11.30: Coffee and welcome   11.30-13.00: Panel 1 – Creating spaces, connections and net…  »

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Witchmarks to protect King James I from evil found at Knole – Archaeology – Science – The Independent

A series of eerie symbols and markings have been discovered under the floorboards of one of Britain’s most important historic houses, scratched into the wood to protect King James I from witches.

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Guy Fawkes night’s oddest traditions are due to a 1606 law

Remember, remember! The fifth of November Gunpowder, treason and plot. I see no reason Why the gunpowder treason Should ever be forgot! Versions of this rhyme have been chanted in the UK for centuries…

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Deviant Domesticities: Reflections on the Queerness of Home | NOTCHES

notchesblog.com - notcheseditor
By Stephen Vider Can the home be queered, or has the home been queer all along? This was the question I posed earlier this month as the organizer of The Queerness of Home: Intimacy, Normativity, Domesticity. The symposium, hosted by the Yale Research Initiative on the History of Sexualities, brought together three scholars for a public panel and discussion: Deborah Cohen, Peter B. Ritzma Professor of the Humanities and Professor of History at Northwestern University; Marlon M. Bailey, Associa…  »

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

The Great Moment (1944) – IMDb

Directed by Preston Sturges. With Joel McCrea, Betty Field, Harry Carey, William Demarest. The biography of Dr. W. T. Morgan, a 19th century Boston dentist, during his quest to have anesthesia, in the form of ether, accepted by the public and the medical and dental establishment.

histscimedtech 6 November 2014

JF Ptak Science Books: Social-Techno Anthropomorphy

longstreet.typepad.com - John F. Ptak
JF Ptak Science Books  Post update My friend Jeff Donlan sent along a suggestion for reading Michael Graziano’s Consciousness and the Social Brain–I don’t know anything about the book, but the title has done its job in provoking the imagination.  What the title asks me (apart from whatever the book might be about) is this: how long have people thought about some aspect of a "social brain" and what has that looked like over the decades (or centuries)?  "Social" and "brain", like society, or…  »

histscimedtech 6 November 2014

Matthew Francis, ‘Historians must ask difficult questions, not merely answer them’ | Modern British Studies @ Birmingham

While The History Manifesto is a welcome reminder of the duty of historians to speak beyond the academy – a duty that has in the past been too easily neglected – there is a risk that the approaches outlined by Guldi and Armitage risks underselling the contribution that historians can make. Others have written about…

twitterstorians 6 November 2014

Murder at the museum: death and decay go on display | Culture | The Guardian

theguardian.com - Maev Kennedy
Wellcome Collections exhibition on the history of forensics includes slides from Crippen case and a stabbed liver Photographs showing the gradual decomposition of human bodies, a scene-of-the-crime sketch of one of Jack the Rippers murders and an hour-long sound recording of an autopsy will be among the more startling displays at an exhibition on the history of forensics, which the Wellcome Collection will show next spring. The curator, Lucy Shanahan, expects visitors to respond much like th…  »

histscimedtech 6 November 2014

Daily press. (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, August 27, 1905, Image 7 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

Daily press. (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, August 27, 1905, Image 7, brought to you by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 6 November 2014

THE GEEK POUND: The Geek Pound VS Museums: Interview with curator Heloise Finch-Boyer, Royal Museums Greenwich

The Geek Pound project first began when we started seeing museum curators, event organisers and marketers taking geek or science fiction fan audiences seriously. The British Library led the way with their 2011 exhibition, OUT OF THIS WORLD: SCIENCE FICTION BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT  and, of course, the more recent COMICS UNMASKED, which we covered on the Geek Pound here. Tate Britain embraced its inner geek as part of its audience outreach for the JOHN MARTIN: APOCALYPSE exhibition, especially …  »

histscimedtech 5 November 2014

Panacea: "Death In The Pot!" Part II

medhistorian.com - Samantha Sandassie
It’s Panacea’s first blogiversary!  About almost 15 months ago, as I sat with my husband and our friends, I declared that I was going to start a history of medicine blog that was going to be awesome.  I had no idea what I was going to write about, if I could write for a non-academic audience, or even what a blog platform was.  What I did have was a Word doc with a long list of potential blog names and Twitter handles.  Honestly, they were all really bad.[1] Then one day, as if by magic,…  »

histscimedtech 5 November 2014