Bulletins

We all love flap anatomies!  This layered look at…

We all love flap anatomies!  This layered look at the ear is from Henry H. Rassweiler’s Portfolio of Life, a 19th century work of popular medicine.  

histscimedtech 21 October 2014

When Jews Found Refuge in Pakistan – Forward.com

When Hazel Kahan’s parents escaped Nazi Germany to the British-Indian city of Lahore, they didn’t expect that they would one day be interned — together with German Nazis.

twitterstorians 21 October 2014

discarding images – ‘De Herinacio. On the Hedgehog’ the first nature…

‘De Herinacio. On the Hedgehog’ the first nature video based on medieval bestiary (‘the Rochester Bestiary’, British Library, Royal 12 F XIII). In Latin with English subs. Dolls & animation: Ala Nunu Leszyńska/Obrazki nunu Storyboard: Karolina Chabier/kchabier Music: Magda Tejchma Narrated by Agnieszka Budzińska-Bennett/Ensemble Peregrina Text after the Latin Physiologus translated by Miłosz Sosnowski Follow Discarding Images on Facebook and Twitter.

twitterstorians 21 October 2014

Boston 1775: Celebrating Abigail and John Adams, 24-26 October

boston1775.blogspot.ru - J. L. Bell
Saturday, 25 October, will be the sestercentennial of the marriage of Abigail and John Adams. The Abigail Adams Historical Society, Adams National Historical Park, and First Church in Weymouth will commemorate that 250th anniversary with a series of events over the weekend. Those events will take place at the Abigail Adams Birthplace and First Church in Weymouth and at the Adams National Historical Park in Quincy. The schedule includes: Friday, 24 October, 11:00 A.M. Reenactment of the Wedding  »

twitterstorians 21 October 2014

New Issue on Study of Gender: 25 Years of Gender & History – Wiley Asia Blog

2013 marks the 25th anniversary of Gender & History, a journal of study of gender. To celebrate this milestone for the journal, a new virtual issue has been created featuring highlights from the past 25 years.

twitterstorians 21 October 2014

The Irish Front – Republican Congress in London | The Dustbin of History

  The Irish diaspora has a long history of involvement in radical politics in Britain. Their contribution to the labour movement in the form of the Chartists, producing leading lights such as Feargus O’Connor and Bronterre O’Brien; the matchmakers strike in 1888 in East London; the London dockers strike of 1889; the influence of James…

twitterstorians 21 October 2014

Christiane Nusslein-Volhard (1942- ) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard studied how genes control embryonic development in flies and in fish in Europe during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In the 1970s, Nüsslein-Volhard focused her career on studying the genetic control of development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

histscimedtech 21 October 2014

How Should We Measure Climate Change? What the Past Can Tell Us

activehistory.ca - Contributor
Protests during Climate Summit 2014. Photo by Jane Marchant. By Dagomar Degroot Last month, world leaders met at UN Headquarters in New York City for Climate Summit 2014. As protests raged across the globe, diplomats established the framework for a major climate change agreement next year. The aim will be to limit anthropogenic warming to no more than 2 °C, a threshold established by scientists and policymakers, beyond which climate change is increasingly dangerous and unpredictable. Just days …  »

histscimedtech 21 October 2014

Hitler’s Hidden Drug Habit; Downton Abbey review – high Hitler, and hang Bates | Television & radio | The Guardian

theguardian.com - Sam Wollaston
Hitler had stomach cramps, flatulence, halitosis and mushy stool so his personal physician pumped him full of drugs. This quack had a lot to answer for Continue reading…

histscimedtech 21 October 2014

BBC – Your Paintings – Thomas Linacre (1460–1524)

View Thomas Linacre (1460–1524) by William Miller. Find out more and explore similar paintings in the UK national art collection.

histscimedtech 20 October 2014

Panic over Ebola echoes the 19th-century fear of cholera

On October 19 an inspector sent north from London to Sunderland reported a long-awaited arrival: the first British case of cholera. It was 1831 and as part of a second pandemic cholera had again progressed…

histscimedtech 20 October 2014

Prelude to Bandung: The Interwar Origins of Anti-Colonialism | Imperial & Global Forum

imperialglobalexeter.com - CIGH Exeter
The Gathering of Visionary Anti-Imperialism. Plenary Meeting, Brussels Congress 1927. Source: Louis Gibarti (Hrsg.), Das Flammenzeichen vom Palais Egmont, Neuer Deutscher Verlag, Berlin (1927) Fredrik Petersson Åbo Akademi University Russian State University for the Humanities (RGGU), Moscow In 1927, the “First International Congress against Imperialism and Colonialism” convened in Brussels at Palais d’Egmont. The event celebrated the establishment of the League against Imperialism, and as the …  »

twitterstorians 20 October 2014

CfA: Global Humanitarianism Research Academy (GHRA) | Humanitarianism & Human Rights

hhr.hypotheses.org - Fabian Klose
  Academy Leaders:    Fabian Klose (Leibniz Institute of European History Mainz) Johannes Paulmann (Leibniz Institute of European History Mainz) Andrew Thompson (University of Exeter) in co-operation with the International Committee of the Red Cross (Geneva) and with support by the German Historical Institute London Venues:                   Leibniz Institute of European History Mainz and Archives of the International Committee of Red Cross Geneva Date:                       13-24 July 2015 Dea…  »

twitterstorians 20 October 2014

Metamorphoses | Facebook

Metamorphoses. 186 likes · 191 talking about this. This project examines art and science relationships through an analysis of a 300-year-old English copy…

histscimedtech 20 October 2014

Book Sale Catalog from the University of Chicago Press

The Book Sale Catalog from the University of Chicago Press offers deep discounts on hundreds of books we publish, plus books from the fine publishers we distribute.

histscimedtech 20 October 2014

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt. 3 | Corpus Newtonicum

corpusnewtonicum.wordpress.com - corpusnewtonicum
It’s Sunday evening, 10 pm, and I am in Bloomington, Indiana. In the past week I have been staying and working with the marvellous Wally Hooper, a man of many qualities. He is an excellent scholar, an IT wizard, and most of all one of the most generous men I have ever met. I have been looking forward to meeting him in the flesh ever since our first email contact, and there is much I hope to learn from him. When I arrived last week I was in a jubilant mood about the Newton conference at the Hunt…  »

histscimedtech 20 October 2014

Dr. Stanley Burns, the Man Behind ‘The Knick’ | VICE Canada

Meet the New York ophthalmologist and historian who owns the world’s largest collection of early medical and historical photography and was in charge of making sure The Knick was accurate.

histscimedtech 20 October 2014

Doomsday Men by P.D. Smith | PopMatters

British historian explores the development of nuclear weaponry and its impact on society in Doomsday Men.

histscimedtech 20 October 2014

"This Misterie of Fucking": A Sex Manual from 1680—Blog—The Appendix

<em>The School of Venus,</em> a forgotten book from 1680 that includes helpful tips on what to call "the Thing which with a Man Pisseth" and how to master the "Mistery of Fucking."

histscimedtech 19 October 2014

Петиция · Reinstate Summer Seminars and Institutes Overseas · Change.org

The National Endowment for the Humanities’ Summer Seminars and Institutes provide extraordinary educational opportunities to teachers of all levels….

twitterstorians 19 October 2014

6 Things I’ve Learned from Reading Penny Dreadfuls | Hannah Kate

hannahkate.net - admin
As you might know, I’ve recently been editing the Digital Periodicals series for Hic Dragones: new serialized eBook editions of classic Victorian penny dreadfuls. Penny dreadfuls (or penny bloods, as they’re also known) were long-running sensational stories, sold for a penny an issue in cheap, pulp newspapers and pamphlets. I estimate that I’ve now edited and formatted around 750,000 sensational words and read around a million more (penny dreadfuls are pretty epic in their length!), so I thought  »

twitterstorians 19 October 2014

The Food That Fuelled The Front | Imperial War Museums

From tinned beef stew to Army-issued biscuits, here’s some of the food that fuelled the front in the First World War.

twitterstorians 19 October 2014

Telling the Story of Women in Printing « The Junto

earlyamericanists.com - Joseph M. Adelman
As part of the celebration of Ada Lovelace Day, Joseph M. Adelman ponders how we can more effectively tell the story of women in early American printing.

twitterstorians 19 October 2014

Why the fine ‘Journal of Military History’ is the opposite of ‘International Security': The tons of interesting facts I learned

Remember how I got all cranky when the mailboat brought International Security to my dock and Iwas disappointed with how boring and irrelevant it was?

twitterstorians 18 October 2014

Ebola: an opportunity for an interdisciplinary approach to the crisis of the ‘anthropocene’ | Unquiet mind of a Transdisciplinary Scholar

UPDATE: Thanks to a friend, here is a link to an article that looks at Ebola from a medical anthropological perspective Between moving and traveling, I had not always been the most up-to-date with what was going on the world beyond what was most pressing to my immediate circumstance. When I first heard about the […]

histscimedtech 18 October 2014

Itching and Scabbiness | Early Modern Medicine

‘The Itch is a filthy Distemper infesting the External Parts of the Body universally, but more particularly the Joints, and between the Fingers’, wrote Thomas Spooner, author of a multi-edition treatise on the subject of ‘the itch’.[1]  Skin diseases and itchiness generally seem to be part and parcel of early modern life. Venereal diseases had…

histscimedtech 18 October 2014

White House Down: Invasions of Washington in Culture and History : We’re History

werehistory.org - Ben Railton
Summer blockbusters seem to proceed in pairs—the dueling volcano films, the competing asteroid films, and so on—and in 2013 the trend continued with a pair of action films in which 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. came under assault. The early entrant was March’s Olympus Has Fallen, with disgraced Secret Service agent (and Scotsman!) Gerard Butler fighting terrorists who take the president (Morgan Freeman) and White House hostage; in June came White House Down, in which the president himself (Jamie Foxx)…  »

twitterstorians 18 October 2014

Feature: intellectual cowardice | Features | Times Higher Education

Scholarship can be a fearsome activity, as Chris Walsh discovered when he set out to investigate the figure of the coward

twitterstorians 18 October 2014

Dare Quam Accipere | thechangingpalette

thechangingpalette.com - Andrew Seal
My earliest memory of Thomas Guy was seeing him on his pedestal in the forecourt of Guy’s Hospital the day I came for my medical school interview.  I wonder what he thought of this keen young man, wide-eyed and full of enthusiasm striding passed him towards his hoped-for future. I hope he was pleased with what he saw, for I would see him every day for many years to come. Occasionally I would remember to wish him a good morning or a good evening, and thank him for founding this great hospital all  »

histscimedtech 18 October 2014

An Epistemology of Media Bias | s-usih.org

s-usih.org - Ray Haberski
The following is a guest post from Nicole Hemmer, who is a visiting assistant professor at the University of Miami and a research associate at the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. She also writes for media outlets, […]

twitterstorians 18 October 2014

Searching for DNA’s Dark Lady

kousoulis.sni.gr - Antonis Kousoulis
Ever since the 1960s every discussion on James Watson and Rosalind Franklin seems to start from Watson’s 1968 book The Double Helix. As the first account – and first impression – of the story of DNA discovery, it has become a lasting reference point in such a way that it has “polluted” all later histories […]

histscimedtech 18 October 2014

What really happened in the London Beer Flood 200 years ago? – Features – Food + Drink – The Independent

An unlimited, free supply of beer – it sounds wonderful doesn’t it? But when it is over one million litres in volume and in a tidal wave at least 15 feet high, as it was in the London Beer Flood on 17 October 1814, the prospect seems less appealing.

twitterstorians 18 October 2014

An Interview with a Gold-Headed Cane | the generous georgian: dr richard mead

Dr Mead’s gold-headed cane, wood, gilt © The Royal College of Physicians Nowadays people might associate doctors with their stethoscopes, but from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries people would have thought of the physician’s cane. The use of these canes dates back to classical times, and their purpose was similar to the sinister-looking beaks of the masks worn by plague doctors. It was commonly thought that contagion was spread by putrid air, so the beaks of masks and the hollow knobs  »

histscimedtech 18 October 2014