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Position: Assistant Professor in the History and Rhetoric of Science and Technology – News from UC Berkeley Department of Rhetoric

The Department of Rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley invites applications for a tenure-track position at the Assistant Professor …

histscimedtech 16 September 2014

Patrick McCray: Transhumanism and Timothy Leary’s SMI2LE | Cosmologics Magazine

  Western culture has long had a secular belief, b […]

histscimedtech 16 September 2014

True Science, Fake History | Chemical Heritage Foundation

Scientists are known to be dedicated to accuracy. But sometimes, as in the case of Francesco Redi, a sense of humor can lead one astray.

histscimedtech 16 September 2014

What the Apothecary Ordered | The Quack Doctor

I’m delighted to announce that 10 August is the UK publication day for a pocket volume I compiled for Old House Books, an imprint of Shire Publications. What the Apothecary Ordered gathers together some of the more peculiar remedies of the last two millennia, and presents them alongside evocative images … Continue reading

histscimedtech 16 September 2014

Timeline Photos – National Museum of Health and Medicine | Facebook

These Japanese wooden dentures were donated to NMHM by a Japanese physician in 1899, and even then were considered very rare. This is a lower set of…

histscimedtech 16 September 2014

History of the development and evolution of l… [Anesthesiology. 2003] – PubMed – NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

histscimedtech 16 September 2014

Library Lates: Quadrants: Telling the Time by the Sun and Stars : Events : What’s on : RMG

Join curator Louise Devoy as she uses the rich collections of the Caird Library to explain the history and use of this ingenious device favoured by astronomers, surveyors, navigators and timekeepers

histscimedtech 15 September 2014

BSHS Postgraduate Conference 2015 – Abstract Submission

This is a call for individual papers and paper sessions for the next BSHS Postgraduate Conference to be hosted by the Department of Science and Technology Studies at University College London from 7-9 January 2015!Conference Details:The BSHS Postgraduate Conference is an annual conference for postgraduate scholars in the history of science, technology, and medicine interested in meeting and sharing research with other postgraduate scholars. This is a great opportunity to build professional and …

histscimedtech 15 September 2014

‘Science in the making’: the BBC’s first engagement with engagement? | Engaging Research

open.ac.uk - Allan Jones
In spring 1931, the BBC transmitted six weekly radio programmes, under the title Science in the Making, as part of its adult education provision. Each week a different scientist outlined his area of research, and in five cases invited listeners to … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 15 September 2014

An Apothecary’s Annotations: Eighteenth-Century Medical Notes in a Seventeenth-Century Text | Library Collections

blogs.unimelb.edu.au - atedeschi
Since 2009, the rare books collection of the Brownless Medical Library has been housed by Special Collections in the Baillieu Library. This collection, which numbers 1,850 volumes, is strongest in eighteenth and nineteenth-century material. Some earlier texts are also held, such as sixteenth-century editions of the Galeni librorum quarta classis and La farmacopea o’antidotario dell’eccellentissimo Collegio de’ signori medici di Bergomo (both published in Venice, 1597) and a copy of the 1698 edi…  »

histscimedtech 15 September 2014

It’s time to criminalise serious scientific misconduct – opinion – 15 September 2014 – New Scientist

Research misconduct degrades trust in science and causes real-world harm. As such, it should be a crime akin to fraud, argues Richard Smith

histscimedtech 15 September 2014

Births and the Collective Provision of Welfare: The Long View, c.1550-2014 | Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities

lcmh.wordpress.com - Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities
A free public lecture by Prof Simon Szreter. Thursday, 18 September 2014, 5pm Conference Auditorium 2, University of Leeds Simon Szreter is Professor in History and Public Policy at the University of Cambridge.  He has written extensively on the history of fertility, sexuality and birth, and as well as tracing the history of birth and welfare over the last c.500 years, this lecture will consider how this history can inform current policy and practice. Hosted by the School of History’s Health, M…  »

histscimedtech 14 September 2014

The Cork scientists who were snubbed by sexism | Irish Examiner

The Ballylickey botanist; the Skibbereen astronomer; the Cloyne caterpillar collector, Madame Dragonfly. Robert Hume highlights the lives and achievements of three female scientists from Co Cork, and the obstacles they faced to achieve recognition of their work

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Guest Post by Alexis Smets: Religious and Spiritual Alchemy | Forbidden Histories

Alexis Smets took his Masters degrees in Philosophy and in Philosophy of Science at the University of Brussels. He subsequently began his doctoral studies in the History of Philosophy and Science at the Radboud University Nijmegen (The Netherlands). His doctoral research is about the imagery in early modern books of chemistry. Modern views on alchemy…

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Science Friday

Science, technology, and other cool stuff from the folks behind public radio’s Science Friday. It’s brain fun, for curious people.

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Galvanism & Deafness | Jaipreet Virdi-Dhesi

Galvanism is a medical treatment that involves the application of electric currents to body tissues in order to stimulate the contraction of muscles. First experimented in the late eighteenth-century by Luigi Galvani (1737-1798) who investigated frog legs twitching once sparked by an electric current, galvanism was believed to be a miraculous application of scientific prowess…

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Assistant Professor, Tenure -Track, History of Science, Medicine & Technology – HigherEdJobs

Jobs in higher education. Faculty and administrative positions at colleges and universities. Updated daily. Free to job seekers.

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Dall, William Healey, 1845-1927 – Biodiversity Heritage Library

The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

CHoM News » September 18: Colonial Governance and Medical Ethics in British India, 1870-1910

cms.www.countway.harvard.edu - Andra Langoussis
Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine   Colonial Governance and Medical Ethics in British India, 1870-1910 Kieran Fitzpatrick: D.Phil candidate at the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Oxford, and Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Studentship holder 2013-2016 The first in a series of four lectures…  »

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Undergraduates — Canadian Society for the History of Medicine / Société Canadienne d’histoire de la médecine

Hannah Summer Studentship – Bourses d’été du Hannah The Hannah Summer Studentship offers undergraduate students an opportunity to study and learn the techniques of historical research and to encourage future serious study of medical history. We welcome applications from students

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Clever Hans and the Origins of German Experimental Parapsychology: Sixth Pre-Print Article from SHPSC Special Issue | Forbidden Histories

In the sixth pre-print article from the upcoming Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences special issue on psychical research, Chantal Marazia and Fabio De Sio reconstruct the story of the famous “thinking horses” of Elberfeld and their main investigator, Karl Krall. CLEVER HANS AND HIS EFFECTS. KARL KRALL AND THE ORIGINS OF EXPERIMENTAL PARAPSYCHOLOGY IN GERMANY Fabio De Sio (Heinrich Heine Universität, Düsseldorf) & Chantal Marazia (Université de Strasbourg) Abs…  »

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

Our Reading List (#2) | Medical Heritage Library

medicalheritage.org - Hanna Clutterbuck
Here’s some of what we’ve been reading this week to help ease you into the weekend… The Recipes Project blog has a great piece on Teaching with Historic Recipes. Personally, I’d love it if someone could teach me to make the glow-wine from Lewis Feuchtwanger’s Fermented Liquors. If that doesn’t strike your fancy, check out one of our other cooking-related titles. Martin GrandJean has some interesting infographics and thoughts on “who follows who” in the Twitter digital humanities community. Lind…  »

histscimedtech 13 September 2014

A 17th Century Space Race | Leaping Robot Blog | Patrick McCray

patrickmccray.com - Patrick McCray
In 1638, an entry appeared in the Stationers’ Register, the book maintained by London’s publishing industry that recorded names of new books for nascent copyright purposes. It noted the publication of a work called The Man in the Moone. Subtitled “A Discourse of a Voyage Hither,” it is regarded today as the first English-language work of science fiction.1 Its author was not, despite the cover’s claim, Domingo Gonsales – who is nevertheless an important part of the book – but rather an English c…  »

histscimedtech 12 September 2014

The Cork scientists who were snubbed by sexism | Irish Examiner

The Ballylickey botanist; the Skibbereen astronomer; the Cloyne caterpillar collector, Madame Dragonfly. Robert Hume highlights the lives and achievements of three female scientists from Co Cork, and the obstacles they faced to achieve recognition of their work

histscimedtech 12 September 2014

Quantum Harmonies: Modern Physics and Music – The Nature of Reality

pbs.org - Paul Halpern
The universe is built on harmonies. The Pythagoreans had it right when they married mathematics, music, and the cosmos. Just as mathematical patterns underlie the musical scales and intervals most pleasing to the ear, they also describe the probability waves at the heart of quantum theory. More than 2500 years ago, according to ancient sources, Pythagoras applied his discoveries in music theory to the behavior of the celestial objects. Pluck a string, and the pitch of the note it produces is re…  »

histscimedtech 12 September 2014

Occupational Therapy students at Washington…

Occupational Therapy students at Washington University attend an anatomy class, 1950.

histscimedtech 12 September 2014

The Daily Ardmoreite. (Ardmore, Okla.) 1893-current, May 14, 1916, SECTION ONE, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The Daily Ardmoreite. (Ardmore, Okla.) 1893-current, May 14, 1916, SECTION ONE, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3, brought to you by Oklahoma Historical Society, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 12 September 2014

Bringing Together #histSTM and #FergusonSyllabus ~ AmericanScience: A Team Blog

In late August, historian Marcia Chatelain started the twitter campaign #FergusonSyllabus as a response to the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri following the death of 18-year old Michael Brown at the hands of local police. For Chatelian, an Assistant Professor of History at Georgetown, #FergusonSyllabus was a way for teachers and scholars across the country to crowdsource ideas about how to address the events of Ferguson in their own classrooms. Rather than ignore such a pivotal moment, and all of …  »

histscimedtech 12 September 2014

Call for Papers – Southern Association for the History of Medicine and Science

Below is the paper submission form for the 2015 SAHMS meeting in Jackson, Mississippi.  If the paper has multiple authors, make sure to include the names of all authors for the paper.  For session…

histscimedtech 12 September 2014

Science, Storytelling, and Environmental History

niche-canada.org - John Thistle
This is the 6th in a series of posts written by recipients of NiCHE New Scholar Travel Grants to attend the World Congress of Environmental History in Guimarães, Portugal.   The diversity of research on display at the World Congress of Environmental History this year was, in a word, remarkable. A quick list of paper topics reveals a little of this diversity: in one session we learned about long-term climate change in South Africa; in another about urban environmental issues in China; and in yet…  »

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

What a joke ~ AmericanScience: A Team Blog

americanscience.blogspot.nl - David Roth Singerman
One frigid February evening, I arrived home from a long day of dissertation-writing and fellowship-applying at my MIT office, and settled down with some kind of takeout to watch the latest episode of FX’s "Archer." I thought I was done with the history of metrology for the day. I was so wrong. For those of you who don’t know "Archer," it can be a little difficult to describe. It’s an animated spy spoof, set in a quasi-1960s world in which the private espionage contractor of ISIS (Internat…  »

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

Women using scientific instruments on Pinterest | 57 Pins

Pins about Women using scientific instruments hand-picked by Pinner Rebekah Higgitt | See more about rosalind franklin, chemistry and instruments.

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

Collective Fat Awareness in 1950s America: Wishful Shrinkers or Cheerful Cherubs? | Nursing Clio

nursingclio.org - Guest Author
By Jessica Parr I recently returned to New Zealand, the country where I grew up and met with a childhood friend for a long overdue catch over coffee. The conversation turned to my doctoral research and how my recent research trip to the Midwest had gone. As I recounted my archive adventures and my delight at finding such a wealth of popular literature concerning obesity from the late 1940s, my long-time friend looked up and exclaimed: was obesity a problem in the 1950s? This is not the first ti…  »

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

Michael Osborne, “The Emergence of Tropical Medicine in France” (University of Chicago Press, 2014)

newbooksinscitechsoc.com - New Books Network
In The Emergence of Tropical Medicine in France (University of Chicago Press, 2014), Michael Osborne offers a new way to think about and practice the history of colonial medicine. Eschewing pan-European or Anglo-centric models of the history of colonial medicine, Osborne’s book focuses on the centrality, transformations, and ultimate demise of naval medicine in France in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Motivating the central arguments and narrative of the book is a concern with pl…  »

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

Lecturer in History of Health and Medicine at University of Strathclyde

View details for this Lecturer in History of Health and Medicine job vacancy at University of Strathclyde in Scotland. Apply now on jobs.ac.uk

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

Evening star. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 14, 1906, Page 3, Image 27 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

Evening star. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 14, 1906, Page 3, Image 27, brought to you by Library of Congress, Washington, DC, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

It’s Okay To Be Smart • Sun, you’ve got something on your face… No, right…

Sun, you’ve got something on your face… No, right there… In the summer of 1612, Galileo made a series of historic sunspot observations. Every day, he would sketch the magnetic blemishes present on the…

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

Writing that inspired a generation of scientists

A long exile and a short book that set the agenda for postwar science and the start of molecular genetics

histscimedtech 11 September 2014

11 Things You Won’t See on Display at the Mütter Museum | Mental Floss

mentalfloss.com - Erin McCarthy
On a cart in Anna Dhody’s office sits a small, innocuous box marked “caramel Danish rolls.” Open it up, though, and you won’t find a pastry; instead, there’s a human skull nestled inside. Nearby, there’s another cardboard box—this one labeled “brain slices”—and on the bookshelf sits a jar of dried human skin. The presence of these items might seem pretty weird—if not alarming—under typical circumstances, but this is not a typical office.

histscimedtech 11 September 2014