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Robert Mitchell, “Experimental Life: Vitalism in Romantic Science and Literature” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2013)

newbooksinscitechsoc.com - New Books Network
Robert Mitchell’s new book is wonderfully situated across several intersections: of history and literature, of the Romantic and contemporary worlds, of Keats’ urn and a laboratory cylinder full of dry ice. In Experimental Life: Vitalism in Romantic Science and Literature (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), Mitchell argues that we are in the midst of a vitalist turn in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, and that this is only the latest in a series of eras of what he calls…  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

"Cellular death in morphogenesis of the avian wing" (1962), by John W. Saunders Jr., et al. | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

In the early 1960s, John W. Saunders Jr., Mary T. Gasseling, and Lilyan C. Saunders in the US investigated how cells die in the developing limbs of chick embryos. They studied when and where in developing limbs many cells die, and they studied the functions of cell death in wing development.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

‘Search until you find a passion and go all out to excel in its expression’ | Harvard Gazette

Experience is a series of interviews with Harvard faculty covering the reasons they became teachers and scholars, and the personal journeys, missteps included, behind their professional success. First up is E.O. Wilson, one of the most accomplished biologists of the past century. Interviews with Melissa Franklin, Martha Minow, Stephen Greenblatt, Sarah Lawrence-Lightfoot, Steven Pinker, Laurel Ulrich, Helen Vendler, and Walter Willett will appear in coming weeks. Edward O. Wilson, the Pellegrino  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

The Cullen Project – Glasgow, United Kingdom – College & University | Facebook

The Cullen Project, Glasgow, United Kingdom. 40 likes · 6 talking about this. ‘The Cullen Project’: AHRC-funded collaboration between Glasgow University School of Critical Studies and the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

New Isis: Organizational Revolution and the Human Sciences, Neurohistory, & More | Advances in the History of Psychology

ahp.apps01.yorku.ca - Jacy Young
The March 2014 issue of Isis, the official journal of the History of Science Society, is now online. Included in this issue are a number of items of interest to AHP readers, including a special Focus section on Neurohistory. Full titles, authors, and abstracts follow below. “The Organizational Revolution and the Human Sciences,” by Hunter Heyck. The abstract reads, This essay argues that a new way of understanding science and nature emerged and flourished in the human sciences in America between  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

Abstracts | Buildings & the Body Symposium

Session 1: Narratives and Biographies of Buildings Long Papers Richard Newman - Archaeological Site Director, Cambridge Archaeology Unit, University of Cambridge The School of Pythagorus, Cambridge: the biography of a later 12th century townhouse The School of Pythagoras in Cambridge represents the rare survival of a substantial late 12th century masonry townhouse. Elucidated by the results…

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

King’s College London – History of Health & Medicine annual lecture History of Health & Medicine annual lecture

The History of Health & Medicine annual lecture 2014 will be given by Warwick Anderson, University of Sydney.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

Yesterday’s drugs are tomorrow’s medicines – Benjamin Breen – Aeon

aeon.co - Benjamin Breen
My sister is a witch. Or, more precisely, a Wiccan astrologer and tarot reader. Growing up as a kid who worshipped Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking, I found it hard to square her worldview with my own. But that didn’t stop me from feeling a thrill when I visited her shabbily ornate, mist-clad Victorian house […] The post Under the influence appeared first on Aeon Magazine.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

The History of the Future: a Reading List | Longreads

blog.longreads.com - Julia Wick
Below is a guest reading list from Daniel A. Gross, journalist-in-residence at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. He also writes and produces radio about the lives of stuff and the stuff of life. *** Journalism has been called the first draft of history. Here are 5 technology stories that belong in the second draft. Like a lot of technology journalism, they’re each focused on an emerging future, which at times makes them a bit breathless with excitement. But unlike m…  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

More Medical Recipes from Thomas Scattergood’s Diaries | Darin Hayton

Thomas Scattergood copied a number of recipes into one of his later diaries, one that dates from just after the turn of the century. Many of these recipes he took from “the Countess of Kent.” Shortly after Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent, died, a book of her medical recipes were collected and published in two versions: A choice manual of rare and select secrets in physick and chyrurgery collected and practised by the Right Honorable, the Countesse of Kent, late deceased ; as also most exquisite  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

Ptak Science Books: Before "Cosmos" 2012 there was "Cosmos" 1845

JF Ptak Science Books Post 1577 Before the Neil deGrasse Tyson version and update of Carl Sagan’s landmark tlevision series, Cosmos, there was Alexander von Humboldt, and his enormously influential book of the same title, printed in 1845-1862. Well, von…

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

When Physicians Give Up: Anna Maria Luisa de’ Medici’s Infant Convulsion Powder | The Recipes Project

recipes.hypotheses.org - Ashley Buchanan
By Ashley Buchanan On July 19, 1736, Baroness Massimilianna Moltke wrote Anna Maria Luisa, the Electress Palatine and last Medici princess, to thank her for sending a “miraculous powder” to treat infant convulsions, or “male caduco.” In the letter sent from … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

Casebooks, photographs, and institutional intimacy | The Other Asylum…

seastoe.wordpress.com - stef eastoe
I have recently been trawling through the mammoth, dusty, fragile patient casebooks of Caterham. I have numerous images of them saved on my pc, but missed having the dirt, the grime, and the feeling of the pages under my fingers. I also found that flipping through the pages physically allowed me to see was contained within the casebooks beyond that of brief notes as to their health, qualitative information which is hidden, or less evident when I scroll through them on my computer screen. So the…  »

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

‘Strong Medicine’ Honors Medical Community’s Response To Marathon Bombing « CBS Boston

Strong Medicine is a digital archive of get well cards, photographs, reflections, and other media documenting the medical community’s response to the Boston Marathon bombings.

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

Timeline Photos – Smithsonian Institution Archives | Facebook

Unidentified men carry pails full of fish specimens to a United States Fish Commission Pennsylvania "Fish Car," a train car designed specifically for…

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

Wellcome Library and NLM establish agreement to make 150 years of biomedical journals freely available online

Representatives of the US National Library of Medicine (NLM), a component of the National Institutes of Health, and the Wellcome Library have signed a memorandum of understanding to work together to make thousands of complete back issues of historically significant biomedical journals freely available online.

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

Studies of Thalidomide’s Effects on Rodent Embryos from 1962-2008 | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Thalidomide is a sedative drug introduced to European markets on 1 October 1957 after extensive testing on rodent embryos to ensure its safety. Early laboratory tests in rodent populations showed that pregnant rodents could safely use it, so doctors prescribed Thalidomide to treat morning sickness in pregnant women. However, in humans Thalidomide interfered with embryonic and fetal development in ways not observed in rodent tests.

histscimedtech 14 April 2014

Lecturer in Medical History, post-1750 (Education and Research) – University of Exeter – jobs.ac.uk

Department of HistoryRef. P46833Salary £32,590, Grade F The result of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise confirms Exeter’s position as one…

histscimedtech 14 April 2014

The Evolution of Evolution: Picturing the Tree of Life – Science blog

britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk - The Science Team
Johanna Kieniewicz introduces the section of Beautiful Science that explores the Tree of Life. In our Beautiful Science exhibition, we explore the evolution of evolution, with a section of the exhibition dedicated to the ways in which we have pictured the tree of life—simultaneously image and metaphor for our relationship…

histscimedtech 14 April 2014

The Problems of an Eighteenth-Century Menagerie | The Sloane Letters Blog

sloaneletters.com - Lisa Smith
One of my favourite letters in the Sloane Correspondence is a complaint from Charles Lennox, the 2nd Duke of Richmond (ca. 1729-1733). Sr I received your letter I am obliged to you for it. I wish indeed it had been the sloath that had been sent me, for that is the most curious animal I […]

histscimedtech 14 April 2014

Message in a Bottle, Found in the Baltic Sea, Is 100 Years Old | Smart News | Smithsonian

While this new Baltic bottle will probably take the prize for oldest verified message in a bottle, it’s probably not actually the oldest

histscimedtech 14 April 2014

Digital record of a stand against chaos | Harvard Gazette

The bombings at last year’s Boston Marathon turned a celebration of the human body and spirit into a day of bloodshed, fear, and mourning. Three people died in the explosions and 16 of the more than 260 injured lost limbs. Now, a year later, as the city remembers the tragedy, a Harvard initiative is telling the story of the doctors, nurses, and emergency responders who saved countless lives. It is also chronicling the days and months that followed and the spirit that helped the city recover and…  »

histscimedtech 14 April 2014

Green Light: Mr D. | Jaipreet Virdi-Dhesi

jaivirdi.com - Jai Virdi
This is the fifth installment of my autobiographical series on my experiences with hearing loss. You can view earlier posts: Prologue; Chapter 1: Seeing Sounds; Chapter 2: Fearless Leader; Chapter 3: The Black Box. Posts appear every other Friday.  Sometime when I was six or … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

About Faces — Sharrona Pearl | Harvard University Press

When nineteenth-century Londoners looked at each other, what did they see, and how did they want to be seen? Sharrona Pearl reveals the way that physiognomy, the study of facial features and their relationship to character, shaped the way that people understood one another and presented themselves. By showing how physiognomy gave people permission to judge others, Pearl holds up a mirror both to Victorian times and our own.

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

The Cyrurgia of Albucasis and other works, 1500

medievalists.net - Medievalists.net
Four surgical treatises, printed in the last year of the fifteenth century, make up the oldest illustrated printed book in the Sibbald Library. The second one, the Cyrurgia of Albucasis, is the most interesting and I shall deal only briefly with the others. The post The Cyrurgia of Albucasis and other works, 1500 appeared first on Medievalists.net.

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

Women using scientific instruments on Pinterest

Explore Rebekah Higgitt’s hand-picked collection of Pins about Women using scientific instruments on Pinterest. | See more about rosalind franklin, chemistry and nancy grace.

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

Neuro-Psychoanalysis – Where Mind Meets Brain – YouTube

Prof. Yoram Yovell and Prof. Mark Solms discuss the newly emerging field of Neuro-Psychoanalysis: what it is and how it can help us understand the human mind…

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

Thomas Scattergood’s Medical Recipes | Darin Hayton

At the end of the 18th century Thomas Scattergood spoke out against what he considered the harsh treatment people suffering from mental illness and advocated for the “humane treatment” of patients in asylums. Scattergood was an influential local Quaker who traveled extensively in the states and in England. In the early 19th century, he suggested to the Philadelphia Yearly meeting that they should do more to care for members who suffered from mental illnesses, who “may be deprived of the use of …  »

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

Happy Cosmonautics Day! | Inside the Science Museum

blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk - Will Stanley, Science Museum Press Officer
Julia Tcharfas, Curatorial Assistant for our upcoming Cosmonauts exhibition, reflects on over fifty years of manned space flight. I am thrilled to be part of the Science Museum team working on a new exhibition celebrating the achievements of the Russian space programme. Cosmonauts: Birth of the Space Age will bring together many unique artifacts that have never before been seen outside Russia, exploring some of the most remarkable and important stories from the dawn of the space age to Russia’s…  »

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

The First Men on the Moon: The Apollo 11 Lunar Landing

Watch, listen, and relive the excitement of the Apollo 11 lunar landing as experienced minute-by-minute by the courageous crew of Apollo 11 and Mission Control.

histscimedtech 13 April 2014

Beneath the white coat: the radical science movement | Alice Bell | Science | theguardian.com

Alice Bell: Science in the 1970s and 1980s was strident, funny and up for a fight, sometimes with itself. Have we lost its vision?

histscimedtech 12 April 2014

Centre of the Cell

Centre of the Cell is an interactive science education centre. Sited in a working bio-medical research laboratory at Queen Mary, University of London, you can learn about how your cells work and how scientists find new ways of putting cells right when they go wrong.

histscimedtech 12 April 2014

Routledge Handbook of Sport, Gender and Sexuality – Google Books

The Routledge Handbook of Sport, Gender and Sexuality brings together important new work from 68 leading international scholars that, collectively, demonstrates the intrinsic interconnectedness of sport, gender and sexuality. It introduces what is, in essence, a sophisticated sub-area of sport sociology, covering the field comprehensively, as well as signalling ideas for future research and analysis. Wide-ranging across different historical periods, different sports, and different local and glo…

histscimedtech 12 April 2014

The Pioneers of Mesmerism – Hypnosis in History – American Hypnosis Association

The public distrust of Mesmerism led to many such instances of hypnotists keeping their results quiet, without publication, which in turn contributed to the air of mystery surrounding the subject.

histscimedtech 12 April 2014

Scientists, unions and greens unite in concern over Kew Gardens cuts | Alice Bell | Science | theguardian.com

theguardian.com - Alice Bell
Cuts to the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew risk the loss of 125 jobs, many in science and public engagement. Continue reading…

histscimedtech 12 April 2014

How To…Plant and Graft All Sorts of Trees | Circulating Now

circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov - Circulating Now
By Michael Sappol The oldest English-language how-to at the National Library of Medicine is a charming and practical little book dating from 1575. In keeping with the custom of the day, the title also serves as a brief description of the contents: A booke of the arte and maner how to plant and graffe all sortes of trees, how to set stones, and sowe pepins, to make wylde trees to graffe on, as also remedies and medicines. With divers other newe practises, by one of the Abbey of Saint Vincent in …  »

histscimedtech 12 April 2014

Catching Nature in the Act: Réaumur and the Practice of Natural History in the Eighteenth Century, Terrall

The book Catching Nature in the Act: Reaumur and the Practice of Natural History in the Eighteenth Century, Mary Terrall is published by University of Chicago Press.

histscimedtech 12 April 2014