histscimedtech

Wilhelm Roentgen | Sciencelearn Hub

This article describes how German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen accidentally discovered x-rays in 1895, and the response to his invention.

8 November 2014

Canadian Bulletin of Medical History / Bulletin canadien d’histoire de la médecine

The Canadian Bulletin of Medical History / Bulletin canadien d’histoire de la médecine is the official organ of the Canadian Society for the History of Medicine/ Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine and is the primary outlet in Canada for refereed

8 November 2014

Birmingham Stories: The First World War | Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery

bmagblog.org - birminghammag
Birmingham Stories is a series of blog posts exploring the experiences of Birmingham men and women during the First World War through the Museum’s collection. Harold Hall Harold Hall in his RAMC Uniform, December 1914 Harold Hall was born in Woodgate on the outskirts of Birmingham in 1893. At the age of 14 he began working at Cadbury’s in the Biscuit Department. When war broke out in 1914, Harold volunteered for the Army but he was classed as unfit for military service. Harold had lost a fi…  »

8 November 2014

Forensics: The anatomy of crime | Wellcome Collection

‘Forensics: the anatomy of crime’ explores the history, science and art of forensic medicine. It travels from crime scene to courtroom, across centuries and continents, exploring the specialisms of those involved in the delicate processes of collecting, analysing and presenting medical evidence. It draws out the stories of victims, suspects and investigators of violent crimes, and our enduring cultural fascination with death and detection.

7 November 2014

HSS at Work at the History of Science Society Annual Meeting | History of Science at Work

Planning on attending the History of Science Society Annual Meeting and interested in learning more about the alt-ac community? We have planned a number of opportunities for grad students, independent scholars, and historians of science of all kinds who are on non-academic or non-traditional academic career trajectories to mingle, talk about work, and seek a supportive community. Here’s where you can find us next week in Chicago:   Friday, November 7, 7:30-8:30pm Stop by the Great Lakes Ballr…  »

7 November 2014

Medical insights | JISC Digitisation and Content

The 20th century is the period in which advances in medicine and public health led to a much improved life span for the populations of developed nations. The 19th century, on the other hand, is seen as time when only the wealthy could benefit from medicine. This is perhaps an unfair assertion. To be able to verify or refute it, one would need a significant number of publications from the 19th century to hand. The UK Medical Heritage Library will provide the most comprehensive set of such public…  »

7 November 2014

Viral Consumption | global-e: a global studies journal

Richard C. Keller With Ebola now on at least three continents, thoughts run to its origins. Discussion circulates around fruit bats, chimpanzees, and other primates, but no one really knows for sure where the disease’s reservoir might be, or what might serve as its vector. Perhaps what is most disturbing is that scapegoating has filled knowledge gaps left by uncertainty. Blame for the epidemic’s spread has fallen on its victims and those who have sought to provide relief in the struggle against  »

7 November 2014

Old medical photographs: Are images of syphilis and tuberculosis patients history or just horror?

slate.com - Rebecca Onion
The recent book The Sick Rose: Disease and the Art of Medical Illustration is not to be leafed through lightly. The volume reproduces 19th-century images from the Wellcome Library’s collection of textbooks and medical atlases, alongside commentary by historian Richard Barnett. Some of its images of suffering patients have the power to rearrange the unsuspecting viewer physiologically, provoking nausea or painful waves of empathy. The experience of looking at The Sick Rose, which is a well-cura…  »

7 November 2014

Rethinking Patent Medicines | Points: The Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society

Joe Spillane recently pointed us to Caroline Rance’s blog, “The Quack Doctor,” and suggested that her posts – filled with advertisements for  things such as “Carter’s Little Liver Pills” and “Effervescent Brain Salt” –  form a “reasonable platform” for historians to “ask the larger questions about  consumer behavior, medical authority, business interests, and the role…

7 November 2014

Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, August 07, 1915, 3:30 Edition, Page SIX, Image 6 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

Honolulu star-bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, August 07, 1915, 3:30 Edition, Page SIX, Image 6, brought to you by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

7 November 2014

Images from the Library | Medical Heritage Library

medicalheritage.org - Hanna Clutterbuck
From C.J. Cullingworth’s Clinical illustrations of the diseases of the fallopian tubes and of tubal gestation : a series of drawings with descriptive text and histories of the cases (1895). As always, for more from the Medical Heritage Library, please visit our full collection!

7 November 2014

History of photography in medicine: 19th-century uses of daguerreotypes in consultation.

During the nineteenth century, physicians used photographs as consultation tools and treated patient photographs as prized collectable objects. Southern physician Edward Archelaus Flewellen sent this daguerreotype of A.P Jackson—one of the earliest surviving consultation photographs—to the famed surgeon Valentine Mott in 1856. Flewellen had been Mott’s student in New York,…

7 November 2014

FWSA Blog » Being a Woman, Being a Mother: Infertility in early modern England

fwsablog.org.uk - FWSA Blog
  by Jennifer Evans Women in early modern England were partly defined by their work, for example spinsters and midwives. Their position in the community was also established by bearing children and becoming a mother. The gathering of women around the birthing room was an opportunity to share reproductive knowledge and to become fully integrated into the circle of married women in their neighbourhood. But not all women achieved motherhood […]

7 November 2014

The Spokane press. (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, January 16, 1910, Page 13, Image 1 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The Spokane press. (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, January 16, 1910, Page 13, Image 1, brought to you by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

7 November 2014

Fantastically Wrong: History’s Most Hilarious Misconceptions About the Elephant | WIRED

wired.com - Matt Simon
Follow Wired Twitter Facebook RSS Fantastically Wrong: History’s Most Hilarious Misconceptions About the Elephant By Matt Simon 11.05.14 | 6:30 am | Edit | Permalink Share on Facebook 0 inShare jj Antiquity’s saddest elephant laments the cursive that someone wrote all over it. Wikimedia In the “Heffalumps and Woozles” ditty from Winnie the Pooh, elephants—those would be the heffalumps—wear tuxedos and use their trunks as accordions and suddenly turn blue. Fantastical, to be sure, but it’s…  »

7 November 2014

t. 1 – Il gabinetto del giovane naturalista / – Biodiversity Heritage Library

The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

7 November 2014

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol: #20 | Whewell’s Ghost

Whewell’s Gazette Your weekly digest of all the best of Internet history of science, technology and medicine Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell Volume #20 Monday 03 November 2014 EDITORIAL: The editorial-team here at Whewell’s Gazette the weekly #HistSTM links digest tend towards the curmudgeonly end of the social spectrum so our attitude to Halloween is perfectly summed up by the following, in our opinion, wonderful photograph. Photographer unknown However the #HistSTM commun…  »

7 November 2014

Keep the Candle Burning

UCL Department of Science and Technology Studies is unique. Award-winning teaching and public engagement. We combine history and philosophy of science, science policy and governance, and science communication and engagement. Offering degrees at all levels.

6 November 2014

Hermione Hobhouse – obituary – Telegraph

telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph Staff
Architectural historian and biographer of Thomas Cubitt who chronicled the destruction of much-loved London landmarks

6 November 2014

The Great Moment (1944) – IMDb

Directed by Preston Sturges. With Joel McCrea, Betty Field, Harry Carey, William Demarest. The biography of Dr. W. T. Morgan, a 19th century Boston dentist, during his quest to have anesthesia, in the form of ether, accepted by the public and the medical and dental establishment.

6 November 2014

JF Ptak Science Books: Social-Techno Anthropomorphy

longstreet.typepad.com - John F. Ptak
JF Ptak Science Books  Post update My friend Jeff Donlan sent along a suggestion for reading Michael Graziano’s Consciousness and the Social Brain–I don’t know anything about the book, but the title has done its job in provoking the imagination.  What the title asks me (apart from whatever the book might be about) is this: how long have people thought about some aspect of a "social brain" and what has that looked like over the decades (or centuries)?  "Social" and "brain", like society, or…  »

6 November 2014

Murder at the museum: death and decay go on display | Culture | The Guardian

theguardian.com - Maev Kennedy
Wellcome Collections exhibition on the history of forensics includes slides from Crippen case and a stabbed liver Photographs showing the gradual decomposition of human bodies, a scene-of-the-crime sketch of one of Jack the Rippers murders and an hour-long sound recording of an autopsy will be among the more startling displays at an exhibition on the history of forensics, which the Wellcome Collection will show next spring. The curator, Lucy Shanahan, expects visitors to respond much like th…  »

6 November 2014

Daily press. (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, August 27, 1905, Image 7 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

Daily press. (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, August 27, 1905, Image 7, brought to you by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

6 November 2014

Panacea: "Death In The Pot!" Part II

medhistorian.com - Samantha Sandassie
It’s Panacea’s first blogiversary!  About almost 15 months ago, as I sat with my husband and our friends, I declared that I was going to start a history of medicine blog that was going to be awesome.  I had no idea what I was going to write about, if I could write for a non-academic audience, or even what a blog platform was.  What I did have was a Word doc with a long list of potential blog names and Twitter handles.  Honestly, they were all really bad.[1] Then one day, as if by magic,…  »

5 November 2014

THE GEEK POUND: The Geek Pound VS Museums: Interview with curator Heloise Finch-Boyer, Royal Museums Greenwich

The Geek Pound project first began when we started seeing museum curators, event organisers and marketers taking geek or science fiction fan audiences seriously. The British Library led the way with their 2011 exhibition, OUT OF THIS WORLD: SCIENCE FICTION BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT  and, of course, the more recent COMICS UNMASKED, which we covered on the Geek Pound here. Tate Britain embraced its inner geek as part of its audience outreach for the JOHN MARTIN: APOCALYPSE exhibition, especially …  »

5 November 2014

Environment(s) in Public: Histories of Climate, Landscape & Ecology at UEA | Thinking Like A Mountain

holmesmatthew.wordpress.com - holmesmatthew9920
Following my recent visit and presentation at the University of East Anglia for the Environment(s) in Public workshop, I returned pleasantly surprised by the plenary session. Two great talks and a intriguing discussion from Professors Mike Hulme and David Matless certainly got the event going! Cultures of Climate: From Antiquity to “The Climate System” Professor Mike Hulme (Professor of Climate and Culture, KCL) began discussions by relating a cultural history of climate – tackling that age-old  »

5 November 2014

Franziska Kohlt | University of Oxford – Academia.edu

University of Oxford, English Language and Literature Department, Graduate Student. Studies Science and Religion, Death Studies, and 19th Century British (Literature). I am reading for a D.Phil. in English Literature at Brasenose College, Oxford. My

5 November 2014

CHoM News » November 20: Making the Suicidal Object: Sympathy and Surveillance in the American Asylum

cms.www.countway.harvard.edu - Andra Langoussis
Department of Postgraduate and Continuing Education, McLean Hospital and the Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine, present: Colloquium on the History of Psychiatry and Medicine “Making the Suicidal Object: Sympathy and Surveillance in the American Asylum” Kathleen Brian, M.A., Ph.D. : Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies, George Washington University The third in a series of four lectures given as the 2014 Colloquium on the History of Psychi…  »

5 November 2014

The Sedalia weekly bazoo. (Sedalia, Mo.) 187?-1904, April 18, 1893, Page 5, Image 5 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The Sedalia weekly bazoo. (Sedalia, Mo.) 187?-1904, April 18, 1893, Page 5, Image 5, brought to you by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

5 November 2014

Biodiversity Heritage Library: Monsters Are Real…

They just look a little different in the light of day.  “HIC SUNT DRACONES.” This phrase translates from the Latin as “here are dragons.” It is etched on the eastern coast of Asia on one of the oldest terrestrial globe maps, the Lenox Globe, dating to 1510. Though the phrase itself is found on only one other historical artifact, a 1504 globe crafted on an ostrich egg, the depiction of monsters and mythological beasts are common on early maps. They crop up most commonly in the unexplored reach…  »

5 November 2014

Fellowships – Linda Hall Library

Resident fellowships for the duration of a minimum of 1 month to a maximum of 9 months are offered in support of research projects in science, engineering, and technology; in the history of science, engineering and technology; or in interdisciplinary topics that link science or technology to the broader culture.

5 November 2014

Cambridge Journals Online – The British Journal for the History of Science – Abstract – Sinanthropus in Britain: human origins and international science, 1920–1939

The Peking Man fossils discovered at Zhoukoudian in north-east China in the 1920s and 1930s were some of the most extensive palaeoanthropological finds of the twentieth century. This article examines their publicization and discussion in Britain, where they were engaged with by some of the world’s leading authorities in human evolution, and a media and public highly interested in human-origins research. This international link reflected wider debates on international networks; the role of scie…

5 November 2014

Medical Intervention and Political Autonomy (British India) – CRASSH

Established at the University of Cambridge in 2001, the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH) works actively with the Schools and Faculties across the University undertaking collaborations that cross faculties and disciplines in order to stimulate fresh thinking and dialogue in and beyond the humanities and social sciences and to reach out to new collaborators and new publics.

4 November 2014

Links: Materialist history of the digital, the economics of blood, and the nomenclature of meat ~ AmericanScience: A Team Blog

Good morning! The beauty of the microscopic world: Check out the winning photographs from this year’s Nikon Small World Microphotography competition. Tiny stuff, massive image-processing. Jussi Parikka on the materiality of digital media and the geological impact of our contemporary digital culture. On a similar note… The labor force behind social media’s censorship machine. The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has issued a report calling on the world to phase out its…  »

4 November 2014

Lost Tech: Things we invented and then forgot | Tycho’s Nose

It’s easy to think of technology as an onward march of incremental progress, each development building on what came before. It’s easy to think everything we’ve ever known has been put to use in making something new and everything we use is as advanced as it can get. It would now seem unimaginable that an archaeological discovery could be more technologically advanced than the society that unearthed it, but that’s not always been the case. Below, I’ll take you on a brief tour of advanced bits …  »

4 November 2014

Did plague doctors wear those masks? | Before Newton

beforenewton.wordpress.com - Kathleen Crowther
I get asked this question a lot when I teach courses in the history of medicine or the history of science.  Even more commonly, people tell me they “know” what plague doctors looked like: they had a mask with a long beak, goggles, gloves and a garment that covered them from chin to ankles.  Indeed, the 12-year-old son of some friends of mine just dressed up as a plague doctor for Halloween in precisely this costume.  But doubts about the historical accuracy of the plague mask have nagged at me …  »

4 November 2014

Science & Technology Studies Cornell – Ithaca, New York – College & University | Facebook

Science & Technology Studies Cornell, Ithaca, New York. 83 likes · 3 talking about this. The Department of Science & Technology Studies is dedicated to…

4 November 2014