Bulletins » History of Science, Medicine and Technology

Recent popular links on Twitter tagged #histsci or #histmed. (What are they saying now?)

histscimedtech RSS feed | More info about the News feeds

Grave Robbing for “The Benefit of the Living” | Dittrick Museum

Rattle his bones over the stones, He’s only a pauper, whom nobody owns. [1] Imagine you are a sick pauper living in Cleveland, Ohio in 1855. For shelter and medical attention, you stay at the newly built City Infirmary, where faculty and students of the Cleveland Medical College offer their services. Alas, your illness cannot be cured and you die – friendless and alone. Your body is taken to the Potter’s Field in Woodland Cemetery across town. But there it is not to stay. Map of Cleveland in …  »

histscimedtech 17 October 2014

Medical Students Modeling Beautiful Anatomy | Street Anatomy

streetanatomy.com - Vanessa Ruiz
A series of print ads and posters art directed by Hamburg based designer, Andreas Haase. The ads were created to promote the Prometheus atlases published by, my favorite creator of anatomy and medical texts, Thieme. They use professional photographs of real medical students overlayed medical illustrations from the atlases. This is first for Prometheus in terms of promoting their atlases in a more artistic way. For them the message is “Beautiful Learning” achieved through stunning and clear medi…  »

histscimedtech 17 October 2014

Desperate Housewives, Neuroses and the Domestic Environment, 1945–1970

Although the figure of the ‘desperate housewife’ is familiar to us, Haggett suggests that many women in the 1950s and ’60s led satisfying lives and that gender roles, while very different, were often seen as equal.

histscimedtech 17 October 2014

Our Neanderthal Complex – Issue 18: Genius – Nautilus

In August 1856, limestone quarry workers blasting out the entrance to the Feldhofer grotto in the Neander Valley of west-central Germany…

histscimedtech 17 October 2014

The MicrobeScope – Infectious Diseases in Context | Information Is Beautiful

How deadly & infectious are the major diseases? A visualised ranking of Bird Flu, Ebola, SARS, Malaria and other infectious diseases.

histscimedtech 17 October 2014

How to Translate a Recipe | The Recipes Project

recipes.hypotheses.org - Sietske Fransen
By Sietske Fransen Have you ever tried to use a recipe in another language, for example from a foreign language cookbook or the internet? If so, then you probably have struggled with identifying some of the ingredients. Personally, I seem … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 17 October 2014

Archive Magpie | REMEDIA

remedianetwork.net - remedianetwork
Our monthly update on recently-acquired, newly available or underused archival sources in the history of medicine. Wellcome Library Ismond Rosen Papers Keywords: Mental Health, Sex, Medicine in Art, Psychiatry The collection comprises material relating to all aspects of Ismond Rosen’s

histscimedtech 17 October 2014

About Women Writing Science, a Project by The Feminist Press | Under The Microscope

What is Under the Microscope?Under the Microscope is the online component of the Women Writing Science project at The Feminist Press. Under t…

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

The Lothian Surgical Audit Archive | The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd) Library and Archive

The papers of the Lothian Surgical Audit (LSA) have now been catalogued as part of our Wellcome Trust funded project and the catalogue is available to view here on the Archives Hub (with an abridged version available on our website here). The archive presents an untapped and unique resource. The story of LSA is a fascinating one (currently unexplored by historians), illustrating how a group of local surgeons used audit to influence and improve surgical care. Professor Sir James Learmonth LSA …  »

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

‘Such mental suffering and such misery’ | ClinicalCuriosities

Here is the link to my contribution to the Perceptions of Pregnancy blog. It is the prelude to a longer chapter I am contributing to a forthcoming interdisciplinary collection on infertility. The chapter itself examines the effects of venereal diseases upon male and female fertility in the decades before World War One, focusing upon differential diagnosis and available treatment regimes. I also draw upon wider social and pseudo-scientific debates by situating the medical discourse on venereal d…  »

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

John Craig Venter (1946- ) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

John Craig Venter helped map the genomes of humans, fruit flies, and other organisms in the US in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and he helped develop an organism with a synthetic genome. In February 2001, Venter and his team published a human genome sequence after using a technique known as Expressed Sequence Tags, or ESTs. Venter worked to bridge commercial investment with scientific research.

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

William Bateson (1861-1926) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

At the turn of the twentieth century, William Bateson studied organismal variation and heredity of traits within the framework of evolutionary theory in England. Bateson applied Gregor Mendel’s work to Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution and coined the term genetics for a new biological discipline.

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

The Pasteur Institute (1887- ) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

L’Institut Pasteur (The Pasteur Institute) is a non-profit private research institution founded by Louis Pasteur on 4 June 1887 in Paris, France. The Institute’s research focuses on the study of infectious diseases, micro-organisms, viruses, and vaccines. As of 2014, ten scientists have received Nobel Prizes in physiology or medicine for the research they have done at the Pasteur Institute.

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

The Story of Typhoid Mary

Typhoid Mary had no idea that she was infected with the disease yet her work as a cook infected many. Find out all about Typhoid Mary and why authorities had a difficult time capturing Mary.

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

cellarspider: ksmithsf: lowereastnowhere:… | clusters & constellations

cellarspider: ksmithsf: lowereastnowhere: ladylaguna: mazarinedrake: cellarspider: twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck: purrsianstuck: During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies.  A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy.  Mission fucking …  »

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

Marie Charlotte Carmichael Stopes | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Marie Charlotte Carmichael Stopes was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 15 October 1880 to Charlotte Carmichael Stopes, a suffragist, and Henry Stopes, an archaeologist and anthropologist. A paleobotanist best known for her social activism in the area of sexuality, Stopes was a pioneer in the fight to gain sexual equality for women.

histscimedtech 16 October 2014

Writing Fieldwork | A symposium on the place of writing in the field sciences | 24-25 April 2015

We invite contributions to a two-day symposium on fieldwork, its history, and the place of writing and texts within it, to be hosted by the Program in History of Science at Princeton University. Fieldwork and the field sciences have long been rich subjects for historical and reflexive scholarship. Academics have devoting considerable attention to theories…

histscimedtech 15 October 2014

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information | Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond

The Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed two significant declassification efforts and has made the newly released documents publicly available on the OpenNet database, which DOE launched 20 years ago to improve public access to declassified documents.  The website is supported by the DOE Office of Classification and hosted by the Offi

histscimedtech 15 October 2014

The Death of Andreas Vesalius | Circulating Now

circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov - Circulating Now
By Michael J. North This year we commemorate the 500th anniversary of the birth of Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564) who is best known for changing how we do medical research with his groundbreaking book, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem (Seven Chapters on the Structure of the Human Body), published in 1543 and generally known as De Fabrica. But it also marks another anniversary: the 450th year since his death on October 15, 1564 on the island of Zakynthos, also known as Zante, in what is tod…  »

histscimedtech 15 October 2014

Current Beckman Center Staff and Fellows | Chemical Heritage Foundation

After receiving the largest application pool yet, CHF is pleased to welcome 24 fellows for the 2014–2015 academic year. Together with nearly a dozen scholars on staff, CHF hosts a sizable community of people working in some aspect of the history and sociology of chemistry and related sciences.

histscimedtech 15 October 2014

Medical and Imperial Utopias | Jonathan Saha

When I was last in Yangon I bought a copy of Colonel M. L. Treston’s Health Notes Medical and Sanitary. It was printed by the Government of Burma and was intended to advise future British officials. Although not dated, since Treston is described as the Inspector-General of Civil Hospitals, a post that he took up…

histscimedtech 15 October 2014

Adolf Hitler Was Prescribed Crystal Meth & Bulls Semen By His Doctor, New Documents Show

Adolf Hitler was a regular user of the Class A drug crystal meth, newly released wartime documents have revealed. According to a 47-page secret American Military Intelligence dossier and the medical diaries and journals of his personal physician …

histscimedtech 15 October 2014

Where the Dead Become Diamonds – The Atlantic

A Swiss company wants to change the way people mourn by transforming the remains of their loved ones into gems.

histscimedtech 15 October 2014

Remembering Klepper — Taming the American Idol

leevinsel.com - Lee Vinsel
This week I am headed to an event at Carnegie Mellon University titled "Celebrating the Work of Steven Klepper." (A PDF flyer for the event is here.) Steven Klepper, 1949-2013 Klepper, who earned his PhD in economics from Cornell in 1975, was a member of CMU’s Department of Social and Decision Sciences. He died too young, robbing of us of the chance to learn more from his insightful, often surprising way of working out problems, a personal method that came to be known as "Kleppernomics." To f…  »

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Facebook

Facebook is a social utility that connects people with friends and others who work, study and live around them. People use Facebook to keep up with…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Astro-confusion | The Renaissance Mathematicus

Dean Burnett is a neuro-scientist who has a blog on Guardian Science Blogs, Brain Flapping, that is usually fairly humorous and mostly satirical.  However last week he decided to take a pot shot at astrology that was rather banal, displaying, as it does, Burnett’s total ignorance of astrology both past and present. Basic rule, if…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Clever Hans and the Origins of German Experimental Parapsychology: Sixth Pre-Print Article from SHPSC Special Issue | Forbidden Histories

In the sixth pre-print article from the upcoming Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences special issue on psychical research, Chantal Marazia and Fabio De Sio reconstruct the story of the famous “thinking horses” of Elberfeld and their main investigator, Karl Krall. CLEVER HANS AND HIS EFFECTS. KARL KRALL AND THE ORIGINS…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Fourth Pre-Print Article from Psychical Research Special Issue now Online: Shannon Delorme on William Carpenter and Spiritualism in Victorian Britain | Forbidden Histories

In the fourth of eight articles from the upcoming Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C special issue on psychical research, Shannon Delorme (Oxford University) takes a closer look at one of the most vocal British 19th-century opponents of spiritualism and animal magnetism, the physiologist William B. Carpenter. PHYSIOLOGY OR PSYCHIC POWERS? WILLIAM…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Third Pre-Print Article from Psychical Research Special Issue: “Haunted Thoughts of the Careful Experimentalist”, by Richard Noakes | Forbidden Histories

A pre-print version of Richard Noakes’ thought-provoking article looking at the complex relationship between unorthodox and established sciences is now available for download on the website of Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences. HAUNTED THOUGHTS OF THE CAREFUL EXPERIMENTALIST: PSYCHICAL RESEARCH AND THE TROUBLES OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Richard Noakes, University of…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

“Was Sir William Crookes Epistemically Virtuous?” Online First Article of Upcoming Special Issue on Psychical Research | Forbidden Histories

I’m pleased to announce the online first/in-press version of an article to appear in an upcoming special issue of Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, dedicated to psychical research and parapsychology in the history of science and medicine. Thanks to the support of Greg Radick, the editor of Studies, I had the…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Photographic Histories of Psychology 2014 | The emotional body

PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORIES OF PSYCHOLOGY One-day postgraduate symposium 25 November 2014, Trinity House (building number 35 on the DMU campus-map) Registration now open registration fee include sandwich lunch, tea and coffee There are various products available, please make sure to register using the correct category: * £0: This category is only for PHRC students and symposium…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Women in Tech from ENIAC to MOM | Nursing Clio

nursingclio.org - Adam Turner
By Adam Turner On September 24, as I enjoyed my second coffee of the morning and caught up on news, a photo caught my eye. In the image, women in colorful saris congratulated each other amidst massive computer monitors. The exuberance of the photo arrested me — as did the obvious techy setting, nerd that I am — but, sadly, what really drew my attention was the fact that these women seemed … out of place. And I wasn’t the only one drawn in by this image. The photo, snapped by AFP photographer …  »

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

Women in Tech from ENIAC to MOM | Nursing Clio

By Adam Turner On September 24, as I enjoyed my second coffee of the morning and caught up on news, a photo caught my eye. In the image, women in colorful saris congratulated each other amidst massive computer monitors. The exuberance of the photo arrested me — as did the obvious techy setting, nerd that…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

The Royal Scottish National Hospital Project | University of Stirling Archives

This is the first of what will hopefully be a monthly series of blog posts on the progress of Continuity of Care – the project to catalogue and conserve the records of the Royal Scottish National Hospital. Thanks to a grant from the Wellcome Trust, this project started in the middle of August and will be completed by July 2015. In 2013, the Royal Scottish National Hospital was given UNESCO status as a collection of international status (see our previous blog post). This reflects the importance …  »

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

‘No man’s land’: Rural / urban boundaries and public health | REMEDIA

By Keir Waddington Writing about the county of Glamorgan, Wales in 1894, the Western Mail noted, ‘No places ought to be more charming and healthful than our pretty villages; but some of them are sadly deceptive’. If reformers came to feel that they could tackle urban sanitary problems through structural reforms, on the surface ‘the…

histscimedtech 14 October 2014

The Donaldsonville chief. (Donaldsonville, La.) 1871-current, October 28, 1911, Image 1 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The Donaldsonville chief. (Donaldsonville, La.) 1871-current, October 28, 1911, Image 1, brought to you by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 14 October 2014