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The Ebola Outbreak: History Repeats Itself: Another Failed Quarantine | Guenter B. Risse – Academia.edu

This essay supplements the previous exposition on the Ebola fever outbreak in Liberia, specifically the mass-quarantine imposed on West Point, a Monrovian township on August 20, 2014 and its similarity to previous public health measures in US history

histscimedtech 28 September 2014

Adventures in Huntingtonland, Pt.1 | Corpus Newtonicum

corpusnewtonicum.wordpress.com - corpusnewtonicum
I feel very privileged to be able to write this post. Here I am, sitting behind my desk on a quiet Saturday afternoon in Pasadena, California. The soaring heat of the past weeks has turned into a mellow breeze, and though the week to come promises interesting temperatures once more, it is all right. I do not particularly enjoy the heat, nor does my skin, but the rewards far outweigh the discomforts. I have been working in the Huntington Library in San Marino since Wednesday afternoon, and what a  »

histscimedtech 28 September 2014

Enter Sandman

nytimes.com - By SYLVIANE GOLD
The opening production of Hartford Stage’s new season, “Ether Dome,” is about the 19th-century physicians, frauds and cranks who pioneered surgical anesthesia.

histscimedtech 28 September 2014

No Laughing Matter? – Bethlem Archives and Museum |

The Finding the Funny Bone project has been all about exploring medical heritage with humour and a fascinating undertaking has been to work with Bethlem Archives and Museum. One of the most famous mental health institutions in the world with a history stretching back over 700 years, Bedlam – as it was formerly known -…

histscimedtech 28 September 2014

The Ever-changing Periodic Table | WEEKEND

The History of the Periodic Table in the Twentieth Century exhibit, curated by Charlotte Abney Salomon GRD ’19, is composed of fewer than twenty objects, and yet it succinctly illustrates the long, nonlinear path our current periodic table has taken in the past 150 years.

histscimedtech 27 September 2014

Eula Biss Wants Us to Rethink Vaccines

In her book “On Immunity,” Eula Biss argues that vaccines are not “unnatural.” They invite the immune system “to produce its own protection.”

histscimedtech 27 September 2014

Matthew Rowlinson, “On the First Medical Blood Transfusion Between Human Subjects, 1818″ | BRANCH

The first experiments in blood transfusion took place in the seventeenth century, using blood drawn from animals. After the death of a French patient and the trial of his physician for manslaughter, transfusion was abandoned for a century and a half. When it resumed in the nineteenth century, the first trials used human blood. They were conducted by the obstetrician James Blundell, who developed transfusion to treat women suffering from hemorrhage after childbirth. During the course of the cent…

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

Keeper of Medicine

The Arts Jobs list details current vacancies and opportunities in the arts community, and Arts News details arts events, news and press releases. Both mailing lists are generated entirely by Arts Jobs and Arts News members.

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

New to the MHL! | Medical Heritage Library

medicalheritage.org - Hanna Clutterbuck
Here are a few highlights from the latest items added to our collection; you can add a RSS feed that will give you updates on our new items here. First, a couple of items with rather immediate topical application: James J. Waring’s The epidemic at Savannah, 1876 : its causes, the measures of prevention adopted by the municipality during the administration of J. F. Wheaton, mayor (1879) J.L. Logan’s The epidemic of 1878 in Mississippi : report of the yellow fever relief work (1879) And some ment…  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

HSS 2014 Annual Meeting | HSS Graduate and Early Career Caucus

HSS 2014 Annual Meeting Chicago, Illinois 6-9 November 2014 Click here to view the 2014 Annual Meeting page on the HSS website.   Use these links to prepare for the meeting: Roommate Finder: Need a roommate for the annual meeting? Use our forum to find one. CV Review sign up: Get your CV reviewed by a professional in the…

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

How to Give Up the I-Word, Pt. 2 // Culture Digitally

culturedigitally.org - Lee Vinsel
This is the second part of a two-part essay, which I originally presented at conferences in the spring of 2014. The first part is available here. The full version of the essay, which I’m happy to share with anyone interested, included a section on the place of innovation speak in the academic sub-discipline of business history. Innovation as the Self-Image of an Age In the last section, I examined some general drivers of the rise of innovation speak. In this section, I would like to narrow my a…  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

The lost IAEA logo | Restricted Data

blog.nuclearsecrecy.com - Alex Wellerstein
Last year I wrote a post on here about the story behind the emblem of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). To quote from it: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has, without much competition, the coolest logo of any part of the UN. Heck, I’ll go so far as to say that they have the coolest logo of any atomic-energy organization in history. I mean, check this thing out: It’s not only an atom, it’s an atom with style. It’s got a classic late-1950s/early-1960s asymmetrical, ja…  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

When Are Drawings Field Notes? – Field Book Project

By Lesley Parilla, Field Book Project I recently cataloged items from Smithsonian Archives RU 7186, United States Exploring Expedition Collection, 1838-1885, and came across a series of wonderful hand-drawn and hand-colored images. Collections I cataloged before this were visually documented with photographs or quick sketches in the midst of field…

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

Ptak Science Books: On Einstein Not Being in the Popular Press Before the Great Eclipse of 1919

longstreet.typepad.com - John F. Ptak
JF Ptak Science Books  Post 2311 Between the Eighth Avenue Line and Julius Einstein in the New York Times Index for April-September 1919, there is nothing.  No Albert. No Albert Einstein.  At least in the newspapers followed by the Index.   Abraham Pais mentions in his wonderful intellectual biography of Einstein Subtle is the Lord that there was no mention of Einstein in this index until after the famous 1919 measurements confirming his theory–this to huge popular acclaim. (This was a months-…  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

Ptak Science Books: Human-Powered Flight of an Antique Nature, 1893

longstreet.typepad.com - John F. Ptak
JF Ptak Science Books  Quick Post "A Light and Simple Motor" is the title for this short article in Scientific American (February 11, 1893).  It is the work of Theodore A. Stark of Ottawa, Illinois, for the use on flying machines–it is a odd contraption that is suspended from an "aeroplane" (in this case the word is used to describe only the wing of the flying machine and not the flying machine itself), functioning like a push/pull device by arms and legs, powering the two large propellers that  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

Biodiversity Heritage Library: Visitors from Paradise: The Paradiseidae

Deep within the rainforest canopy of the Aru Islands, just west of New Guinea, two male Greater Birds-of-Paradise dance among the branches in carefully coordinated steps, their magnificent yellow, white, and maroon plumage undulating gracefully to the rhythm of their own unique song. Carl Linnaeus named this species Paradisaea apoda, meaning "legless bird-of-paradise." The misnomer was based on early trade-skins prepared and shipped to Europe without feet, feeding a notion that these "visit…  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

The American White Pelican | Kestrels and Cerevisiae ::                                             Histories of Science from Kele W. Cable

The American White Pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchus) are in the midst of their southerly migration from their breeding grounds in the Dakotas and Minnesota. I saw some myself at Long Meadow Lake near the Mall of America two weekends ago, in which 15-20 were participating in this slightly discomforting but elegant synchronized fishing/swimming activity: Seeing them, I decided to take some time to see what I could find in the old ornithilogical literature. I was also hoping to find some notes…  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

Notre Dame HPS PhD Program Celebrates 25 Years // News // John J. Reilly Center // University of Notre Dame

reilly.nd.edu - Jessica Baron
The History and Philsophy of Science Program at the University of Notre Dame will celebrate the 25th anniversary of its PhD program with a conference on September 26-27, 2014. Current faculty and students will be joined by alumni/ae over two days for talks on the history of the program, its former directors, and current work being done by ND HPS PhDs.  The conference will take place in 210-214 McKenna Hall, with celebratory dinners each night. On Friday the 26th, the HPS program will pay special  »

histscimedtech 26 September 2014

Request for information: WW1 and ‘shell shock’ | Asylum and Post-Asylum Spaces

By Cheryl McGeachan (https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmediamuseum/30079817…  »

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

Rhetoric and Recipes in the Composition Classroom | The Recipes Project

recipes.hypotheses.org - hillarynunn
Hillary Nunn, The University of Akron A composition class might seem an unlikely forum for discussing early modern recipes, and I have to admit I was wary to pencil them in. The class’s focus on the rhetoric of disease, however, … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

A Lifetime of Healthiness? The Golden Health Library’s “Seven Ages of Man” (Item of the Month) | Books, Health and History

nyamcenterforhistory.org - nyamhistorymed
Cara Kiernan Fallon, this post’s guest author, is a history of science PhD candidate at Harvard University. “The seven ages of man.” From The Golden Health Library. Click to enlarge. Childhood can be full of “vigor and zest” but “Middle age is the time when our sins against the laws of health find us out,” warned physicians writing for The Golden Health Library’s inaugural volume. Published in the late 1930s, The Golden Health Library offered readers five volumes of advice on the “principles …  »

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

Raphael Scholl – Blog – The spirit of HPS (a love letter)

raphaelscholl.org - Raphael Scholl
Last June I was in Vienna for the fifth conference on Integrated History and Philosophy of Science (&HPS5). It was an immensely enjoyable event. Towards the end of the conference, during the very last talk that I saw before I had to leave for the airport, I rediscovered my love for HPS. Here’s how it happened. The beginning was inauspicious. The speaker had made slides with LaTeX, so they were heavy on text.1 What is more, she recited those slides word for word, which is usually considered bad …  »

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

How our botched understanding of ‘science’ ruins everything – The Week

Here’s one certain sign that something is very wrong with our collective mind: Everybody uses a word, but no one is clear on what the word actually means. One of those words is "science." Everybody uses it. Science says this, science says that. You must vote for me because science. You must buy this because science. You must hate the folks over there because science. Look, science is really important. And yet, who among us can easily provide a clear definition of the word "science" that matches…  »

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

Immunology advances from 19th century paved way for current Ebola virus treatment – Health & wellness – The Boston Globe

The antibody treatment given to two American missionaries infected with the Ebola virus may seem like a modern day miracle cure, but researchers created similar, if cruder, antibody therapies as far back as the 1880s to treat diphtheria and pneumonia.

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

Blaming moms for vaccine trends

We’ve long held mothers responsible for nearly everything about childrearing, including vaccinations. And women had special reason to be critical of vaccines at the precise moment that the vaccine schedule for children began to expand decades ago

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

Gordon Watkins Douglas (1921-2000) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Gordon Watkins Douglas researched cervical cancer, breach delivery, and treatment of high blood pressure during pregnancy in the US during the twentieth century. He worked primarily at Bellevue Hospital Center in New York, New York. While at Bellevue, he worked with William E. Studdiford to develop treatments for women who contracted infections as a result of illegal abortions performed throughout the US in unsterile environments.

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, November 10, 1914, Night Extra, Page 2, Image 4 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, November 10, 1914, Night Extra, Page 2, Image 4, brought to you by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

John Hunter’s Anatomical Observations of the Torpedo (or Electric Ray) | Thinking Like A Mountain

holmesmatthew.wordpress.com - holmesmatthew9920
DISCLAIMER: Some graphic (but historic) content. On July 1st 1773, John Hunter’s paper on the anatomy of the Torpedo was read aloud to the Royal Society. Hunter had carefully dissected a series of specimens, carefully noting the position of organs, veins, nerves and cellular membranes. Hunter’s paper was accompanied by a beautiful set of illustrations, comparable to those of The Anatomy of the Human Gravid Uterus Exhibited in Figures, published by his brother William Hunter in 1774 (it is likely  »

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

The Mathews journal. (Mathews C.H. [Court House]) 1903-1937, January 04, 1912, Image 2 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The Mathews journal. (Mathews C.H. [Court House]) 1903-1937, January 04, 1912, Image 2, brought to you by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 25 September 2014

Thinking about science like Louis Pasteur: Lessons from History | Microbe Post

microbepost.org - socgenmicro
Scientific discoveries and achievements from centuries past are often portrayed as a set of fully-fledged concepts and perfect results. The exacting trial-and-error processes and frequent setbacks we know from modern-day science are rarely mentioned. Why could this be – was science ‘easier’ in the past? Dr Keith Turner and Professor Marvin Whiteley of the University of Texas at Austin were intrigued by this phenomenon and looked at 19th century microbiology as a case study. To get a better insi…  »

histscimedtech 24 September 2014

Maritime Lecture Series: The Art and Science of Exploration : Events : What’s on : RMG

Join us for the latest season of our popular maritime lectures linking to The Art & Science of Exploration, 1768-80 in the Queen’s House.

histscimedtech 24 September 2014

Who are the martyrs of science? | Philip Ball | Science | theguardian.com

theguardian.com - Philip Ball
History suggests that scientists opposition to ideological manipulation has often been feeble. Philip Ball argues that the failings are not individual but institutional Continue reading…

histscimedtech 24 September 2014

Reality behind research: 21 years of oral history with Wellcome Witness | Wellcome Trust Blog

blog.wellcome.ac.uk - Holly Story
Thousands of scientific papers are published every year, reporting on interesting results, but the standard format – introduction, materials and methods, results, conclusions, references – leaves little space for the social context of the work. For over 20 years, the Wellcome Trust has been supporting Wellcome Witness seminars, which bring together key figures in research to discuss the stories behind the discoveries. Professor Tilli Tansey discusses the Witness Seminars, and on the occasion of…  »

histscimedtech 24 September 2014

From Nuclear Freeze to Global Warming – and Back – NYTimes.com

takingnote.blogs.nytimes.com - By Teresa Tritch
Climate activists should note that the arms-reduction movement is experiencing significant setbacks.

histscimedtech 24 September 2014

Feeling ‘Louzy’ | Early Modern Medicine

Many people, myself included, have an aversion to the sensation of things crawling over our skin, whether it be insects, arachnids, or other creepy crawlies. In the early modern period it would seem that people were much more accustomed to having their bodies invaded by visitors, but, like us, found these unwanted guests most disturbing.…

histscimedtech 24 September 2014