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King’s College London – Annual Lecture in the History of Health and Medicine

Centre for the Humanities and Health, History of Medicine, History of Science, Technology and Medicine, Annual Lecture, Warwick Anderson

histscimedtech 11 April 2014

Proceedings – History of Anaesthesia Society

Papers published in the  Proceedings  are the opinions of the authors and not necessarily those of the Hon. Editor, nor of Council. Volumes 1-45 can be searched electronically using the free text…

histscimedtech 11 April 2014

Ptak Science Books: Controlling the Vocabulary of Nuclear Warfare

longstreet.typepad.com - John F. Ptak
JF Ptak Science Books   Post 2201–expanded [Part of the Atomic and Nuclear Weapons series.] I think no plumb line was ever so worked with pulleys and wheels, strings and catclaws and other Rube Goldberg devices as were the demographic studies of nuclear warfare.  It is as though their compass rose had no compass, with everything centered on the center, no way out, no way in. just there.  A faceless clock face describing “G-2 o’clock” whenever it pleased.  These studies seem to me the nuclear …  »

histscimedtech 11 April 2014

The search for sustainable energy in 1869 | Scripta manent.

library.missouri.edu - Kelli Hansen
Continuing our theme of engines, this week’s pamphlet is Power without Fuel by James Baldwin, published in New York in 1869.  In this pamphlet, Baldwin explains his attempts to design an engine that isn’t dependent on coal, wood, oil, gas, or other combustible fuel. His idea (he wasn’t the first to think of it) was a variation on the carbonic acid motor: an engine that would run on a solution of carbon dioxide in water.  Engineers investigated carbonic acid engines as a possible replacement for…  »

histscimedtech 11 April 2014

Fighting the Future War: An Anthology of Science Fiction War Stories, 1914-1945: Frederic Krome: 9780415879514: Amazon.com: Books

Fighting the Future War: An Anthology of Science Fiction War Stories, 1914-1945 [Frederic Krome] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. <P>The period between World War I and World War II was one of intense change. Everything was modernizing

histscimedtech 11 April 2014

Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Stephen Jay Gould studied snail fossils and worked at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts during the latter half of the twentieth century. He contributed to philosophical, historical, and scientific ideas in paleontology, evolutionary theory, and developmental biology.

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

Abena Dove Osseo-Asare, “Bitter Roots: The Search for Healing Plants in Africa” (University of Chicago Press, 2014)

newbooksinscitechsoc.com - New Books Network
Abena Dove Osseo-Asare’s wonderful new book is a thoughtful, provocative, and balanced account of the intersecting histories and practices of drug research in modern Ghana, South Africa, and Madagascar. Bitter Roots: The Search for Healing Plants in Africa (University of Chicago Press, 2014) tells the stories of six plants, all sourced in African countries, that competing groups of plant specialists have tried to transform into pharmaceuticals since the 1880s. The leaves and roots and seeds of …  »

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

The Body Appropriate by Stephanie Stewart Bailey — Kickstarter

Stephanie Stewart Bailey is raising funds for The Body Appropriate on Kickstarter! Gallery | Public Dissections | Events |A space in downtown San Francisco to reflect upon the less considered means of living & dying.

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

BBC News – Trees: A personal and national legacy of Evelyn’s Sylva

Why has John Evelyn’s Sylva, the first comprehensive study of UK trees and published 350 years ago, stood the test of time?

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

“Master Docturdo and Fartado”: Libellous Doctors in Early Modern Britain | Dr Alun Withey

dralun.wordpress.com - Dr Alun Withey
I’ve just returned from a great conference at the University of Exeter – the Landscape of Occupations – organised by the project on early-modern medical practice of which I’m a part. There were a great variety of papers and many different aspects of occupation, occupational titles and identities and a range of other factors relating to ‘work’ in early-modern Europe. One of the papers I was struck by was given by Professor Laurinda Abreu of the Unviersity of Evora, Portugal. Her paper explored s…  »

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

Longitude Punk’d: steampunk takes over Royal Observatory Greenwich | Science | theguardian.com

theguardian.com - Dr Heloise Finch-Boyer
As a new exhibition opens at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, Heloise Finch-Boyer asks whether we should laugh at the history of science? This Easter, Steampunks are taking over the Royal Observatory Greenwich showcasing fantastical inventions alongside real historic objects in an exhibition blurring the boundaries between art and science and fact and fiction. Opening 10th April 2014, Longitude Punkd celebrates the madcap inventors, star-gazing astronomers and extremely elegant explorers of the…  »

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

Homoeopathic Medicine & Colonialism in Bengal – Dissertation Reviews | Dissertation Reviews

dissertationreviews.org - Srirupa Prasad
A review of Homoeopathic Families, Hindu Nation and the Legislating State: Making of a Vernacular Science, Bengal: 1866-1941, by Shinjini Das. Homoeopathic Families, Hindu Nation and the Legislating State: Making of a Vernacular Science, Bengal: 1866-1941 by Shinjini Das is a fine work on the colonial career of homoeopathic medicine in Bengal. Framed within critical debates on South Asian historiography, this dissertation makes a valuable contribution to history of medicine. Das studies the pro…  »

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

Special Collections & Rare Books at Mizzou — Continuing our theme of engines, this week’s…

Continuing our theme of engines, this week’s pamphlet is Power without Fuel by James Baldwin, published in New York in 1869. In this pamphlet, Baldwin explains his attempts to design an engine that…

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

#firstgeorgians | Board of Longitude project

blogs.rmg.co.uk - Katy Barrett
The last time I wrote on here was after a visit to Georgians Revealed at the British Library. I lauded the wonderful array of objects that they had on show, but also bemoaned the lack of any real inclusion of science in their rich display of eighteenth-century British culture. Yesterday morning, those gripes were partially laid to rest by another stunning eighteenth-century exhibition that opens at the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace on Friday, and of which I was lucky enough to get a prev…  »

histscimedtech 10 April 2014

Séance 6 du séminaire “Approches et méthodes ST2S” ( Mercredi 16 avril 2014 – 13h) | Département d’histoire des sciences de la vie et de la santé

dhvs.u-strasbg.fr - redaction
Intervention de Christian Bonah (Université de Strasbourg) In the service of industry and human health. The Bayer corporation, industrial film and promotional propaganda, 1934 to 1943 Lors de la sixième séance du séminaire “Approches et méthodes ST2S” qui aura lieu le mercredi 16 avril 2014 à 13h – Salle 2 rez-de-chaussée de l’Institut d’Anatomie – ancien hôpital civil (plan d’accès)

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

Dizhou Tong (1902-1979) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Dizhou Tong, also called Ti Chou Tung, studied marine animals and helped introduce and organize experimental embryology in China during the twentieth century. He introduced cellular nuclear transfer technology to the Chinese biological community, developed methods to clone organisms from many marine species, and investigated the role of cytoplasm in early development.

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

The Return Of Nicholas Culpeper | Spitalfields Life

spitalfieldslife.com - the gentle author
Thanks in no small part to votes cast by readers of Spitalfields Life in the Tower Hamlets People’s Plaques Scheme and to my great delight, I cast my eyes up yesterday in Commercial St to discover a metal plaque for Nicholas Culpeper had appeared upon the building at the corner of Puma Court, close to the site of Red Lion House where Culpeper lived, ran his clinic, tended his herb garden and wrote his English Herbal in the seventeenth century. Culpeper translated medical books into English from  »

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

Hats for Headaches and Migraines | Early Modern Medicine

Recently a friend asked me what early modern people did to combat migraines. From the seventeenth-century manuscript recipe books housed in the Wellcome Library it would appear that many early modern men and women afflicted with migraines, or ‘megrim’, favoured plasters and medicinal hats to relieve their pain. Some of these plasters were relatively simple mixtures…

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

Timeline Photos – US National Archives | Facebook

On April 8, 1864, President Lincoln signed a bill into law, allowing the Columbia Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb and Blind to…

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

Durham academic finds 3,00-year-old skeleton with clogged arteries – The Journal

thejournal.co.uk - The Journal
Furred arteries have been affecting human health for at least 3,000 years, new research by a North East academic has found

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

Rohm and Haas Fellow in Focus Lecture: Alex Csiszar, “The Invention of Peer Review” | Chemical Heritage Foundation

Join us for a free public lecture by Alex Csiszar, John C. Haas Fellow in the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center for the History of Chemistry.

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

Nominations for Giants’ Shoulders #70 | The Sloane Letters Blog

sloaneletters.com - Lisa Smith
Sloane’s birthday is rapidly approaching and April 16 just happens to coincide with a well-known History of Science/Medicine/Technology blog carnival. To celebrate Sloane’s birthday this year, I’ll be hosting Giants’ Shoulders #70. Huzzah! Please send in your blog post nominations by April 15 at the latest. You can send them directly to me at lisa […]

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

The US President’s Council on Bioethics (2001-2009) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

The US President’s Council on Bioethics was an organization headquartered in Washington D.C. that was chartered to advise then US President George W. Bush on ethical issues related to biomedical science and technology. In November 2001, US President George W.

histscimedtech 9 April 2014

Eighteenth-century artificial limbs, clockwork figurines, boat winches, and more! | Scripta manent.

library.missouri.edu - Kelli Hansen
Machines et inventions approuvées par l’Académie royale des sciences, depuis son établissement jusqu’à présent; avec leur description. Dessinées & publiées du consentement de l’Académie, par M. Gallon.  Paris, G. Martin [etc.], 1735-77. MERLIN catalog record.  Recently restored through the Adopt a Book Program.

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

Brown Bag Lecture: “Blast from the Past: 1950s Atomic Jewelry” | Chemical Heritage Foundation

Brown Bag Lectures (BBLs) are a series of weekly, informal talks on the history of chemistry or related subjects, including the history and social studies of science, technology, and medicine. Based on original research (sometimes still in progress), these talks are given by local scholars for an audience of CHF staff and fellows and interested members of the public.

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

A seventeenth-century miner’s brandy recipe | The Recipes Project

recipes.hypotheses.org - mariekehendriksen
By Marieke Hendriksen Recently, I’ve been studying, amongst others, the works of a seventeenth-century Dutch bergwerker, freely translated a miner, or rather a mining specialist. Goossen van Vreeswijck (ca. 1626- after 1689) was an adventurous man, who worked in the … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

Compasswallah • The Compass Chronicles Vol. I: Tales of Attraction

(This is the annotated version of my new column for The Hindu Business Line’s magazine BLink, published on April 4, 2014. The image is a depiction of the Konark Sun temple from James Fergusson’s 1847 text Ancient Architecture in Hindoostan. )  That the Sun Temple of Konark once contained a giant lodestone magnet, which held the entire edifice together by its force — is a story often told. And in the telling, this tale becomes taller, whence idols in the sanctum sanctorum begin to levitate, and …  »

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

Who First Identified Elephant Fossils in America?

wondersandmarvels.com - AdrienneMayor
by Adrienne Mayor (Wonders and Marvels contributor) African slaves dug up some colossal teeth while working in a swampy field on Stono Plantation (North Carolina) in about 1725. The English botanist Mark Catesby visited Stono to view the amazing discovery. His hosts, the plantation owners, told him that the great molars were all that was left of a giant victim of Noah’s Flood from the Bible. At that time, that was the common explanation for all oversized fossils in Europe and the American colo…  »

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

The Real Medical Conditions Behind the Deformed Hands in Rodin’s Sculptures | Science | WIRED

Get in-depth coverage of current and future trends in technology, and how they are shaping business, entertainment, communications, science, politics, and culture at Wired.com.

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

Did Edmond tells Robert to, “sling his hooke!”? | The Renaissance Mathematicus

The circumstances surrounding the genesis and publication of Newton’s magnum opus, Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, and the priority dispute concerning the origins of the concept of universal gravity are amongst the best documented in the history of science. Two of the main protagonists wrote down their version of the story in a series of letters that they exchanged, as the whole nasty affair was taking place. Their explanations are of necessity biased and unfortunately we don’t have  »

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

19th Century Indian Women in U.S. Medical School Part II | Jaipreet Virdi-Dhesi

jaivirdi.com - Jai Virdi
“It is not more difficult to prove that Asiastic women have made good as Christian physicians. In India we point to Dr. Karmarkar and Dr. Joshi…”[1] Since my original posting on three Indian women who attended the Women’s Medical College … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

First Monday Library Chat: Cambridge University Library | The Recipes Project

recipes.hypotheses.org - Michelle DiMeo
Today’s First Monday Library Chat takes us back to England to talk with Dr. Suzanne Paul, Medieval Manuscripts Specialist at Cambridge University Library. The University Library is the central library on Cambridge’s campus, used by members of all Cambridge colleges, … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 8 April 2014

A Corrective To Cosmos | Alex Knapp

A Corrective To Cosmos Cosmos, like most pop histories of science, teaches the false narrative that the history of science is that of a few, heroic, lone geniuses doing battle with the masses and…

histscimedtech 7 April 2014