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Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) and the books that made the father of anatomy | University of Cambridge

Andreas Vesalius was an ambitious young man who was not shy of self-publicity.  Born in Flanders 500 years ago, he had his eye on one of the most prestigious roles in medicine. He sought an appointment as personal physician to the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V. To optimise his chances, Vesalius set out to demonstrate his extensive knowledge of the workings of the human body. One of the ways he did this was to publish in 1543 an extraordinary tome known as the Fabrica, in reference to its Latin …

histscimedtech 24 July 2014

Telling the History of Physics Through Historical Places

Historians are increasingly using the locations of importantevents as a tool to tell the story of science.

histscimedtech 23 July 2014

Water, super-sewers and the filth threatening the River Thames | Environment | The Guardian

theguardian.com - Stuart Jeffries
The Great Stink of the 1800s alerted politicians to the filth in the Thames. The Victorian sewers fixed it, but trouble is brewing again. Is a clean river just a pipe dream? Continue reading…

histscimedtech 23 July 2014

"Experiments in Plant Hybridization" (1866), by Johann Gregor Mendel | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

During the mid-nineteenth century, Johann Gregor Mendel experimented with pea plants to develop a theory of inheritance. In 1843, while a monk in the Augustian St Thomas’s Abbey in Brünn, Austria, now Brno, Czech Repubic, Mendel examined the physical appearance of the abbey’s pea plants ( Pisum sativum) and noted inconsistencies between what he saw and what the blending theory of inheritance, a primary model of inheritance at the time, predicted.

histscimedtech 23 July 2014

A Movable Atlas Showing the Mechanism of Vision

A while back we posted images from Georg Bartisch’s flap anatomy. Here are some images from another flap anatomy (or movable atlas, as it chooses to call itself).  This is an English translation of part IV of G.J.A. Witkowski’s Anatomie iconoclastique, and shows the parts of the eye.  The library also has Part III (the female genital organs) and Part VII (the male genital organs).  

histscimedtech 23 July 2014

Professor Charles Lapworth LL D FRS – Lapworth Museum of Geology

1842-1920 Charles Lapworth was born in Faringdon, Berkshire and trained as a school teacher in Oxfordshire, his main interests at that time being literature, history, art and music. His first post, in 1864, was in Galashiels and in 1875 he was appointed to Madras College in St Andrews. Lapworth’s interest in geology started shortly after his move to Scotland and, although largely self taught in the subject, he soon began to make significant contributions towards unravelling the geology of the S…

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Chinese city sealed off after bubonic plague death | World news | theguardian.com

theguardian.com - Agence France-Presse in Beijing
30,000 residents of Yumen are not being allowed to leave and 151 people have been placed in quarantine after man’s death Continue reading…

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Great moments in Science (if Twitter had existed) | Dean Burnett | Science | theguardian.com

theguardian.com - Dean Burnett
Twitter is the source of a great deal of modern news, and scientists are often encouraged to tweet about their research. So what if Twitter had been around during the times of historic scientific breakthroughs and discoveries? Continue reading…

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

The Story of Pain: Joanna Bourke – Oxford University Press

The story of pain and suffering since the eighteenth century. Prize-winning historian Joanna Bourke charts how our understanding of pain (and how to cope with it) has changed completely over the last three centuries.

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Beyond Energy, Matter, Time and Space

nytimes.com - By GEORGE JOHNSON
Humans might think we can figure out the ultimate mysteries, but there is no reason to believe that we have all the pieces necessary for a theory of everything.

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Asylum and Post-Asylum Spaces | Research group of the University of Glasgow

Welcome to this new blogsite – the ‘Asylum and Post-Asylum Spaces’ site – which aims to be a premier port of call for anyone interested in lunatic asylums, mental hospitals, psychiatric institutions, mental health facilities of all kinds, or indeed the still-wider concerns broadly clustering under the heading of ‘mental health geographies’ (which we also…

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Search Results | Smithsonian Institution Archives

Access the official records of the Smithsonian Institution and learn about its history, key events, people, and research.

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

yovisto blog: Giovanni Schiaparelli and the Martian Canals

On March 14, 1835, Italian astronomer and science historian Giovanni Schiaparelli was born. He is remembered best for his observations of planet Mars, where he discovered a dense network of linear structures on the surface of Mars which he called "canali" in Italian, meaning "channels" but the term was mistranslated into English as "canals" indicating that the observed structures should be of artificial origin.

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Whewell’s Gazette: Vol. 5 | Whewell’s Ghost

Whewell’s Gazette Your weekly digest of all the best of Internet history of science, technology and medicine Editor in Chief: The Ghost of William Whewell Volume #5 Monday 21 July 2014 EDITORIAL: We’re back for another week and a new edition of the best #histsci, #histtech and #histmed links list in the entire cosmos. This week saw the forth-fifth anniversary of the first moon landing. Although in reality, as a political propaganda exercise, this anniversary actually belongs to political hist…  »

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

The Spokane press. (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, January 02, 1910, Image 18 « Chronicling America « Library of Congress

The Spokane press. (Spokane, Wash.) 1902-1939, January 02, 1910, Image 18, brought to you by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA, and the National Digital Newspaper Program.

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Our Manuscript Monday offering comes from the…

Our Manuscript Monday offering comes from the William Beaumont papers held at the Becker Medical Library (the correspondence can be found online here).  During his tenure as a military surgeon stationed at Fort Mackinac, Beaumont treated Alexis St. Martin, a French Canadian fur trapper who had been shot in the stomach.  While St. Martin recovered, he was left with a permanent fistula in his stomach.  Beaumont realized that this would give him a unique opportunity to study the digestive process,…  »

histscimedtech 22 July 2014

Perchance to Dream: Science and the Future—Vol. 2, No. 3—The Appendix

theappendix.net - Anna Marie Roos
Robert Boyle’s remarkable to-do list for future scientists inspires five contemporary researchers to write their own. Read more… Please consider subscribing to The Appendix. Your patronage supports our continued publication.

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Cool Classes: Cold Places || Bucknell University

In this installment of our new web feature, "Cool Classes," Bucknell students heed the call of the wild in winter to understand humankind’s relationship with the world.

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

BBC News – UK astronaut names International Space Station mission ‘Principia’

UK astronaut, Major Tim Peake names his 2015 International Space Station mission ‘Principia’ in honour of Sir Isaac Newton

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Ptak Science Books: A Big Popular Statement on How Small Small Is (1883)

longstreet.typepad.com - John F. Ptak
JF Ptak Science Books   Post 2255 In three issues1 of Nature (London) magazine in 1883, William Thomson (Lord Kelvin)–polymath of a great and inquisitive mind–tried to create a good reference point for the size of atoms, mainly to establish that their size while being incredibly small were not unimaginably so, and that even objects of this minor magnitude could be approximated and studied.  And he did so with great ease and in a popular general-audience sort of way. All told, this was a very …  »

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Footage of the 8th International Congress in Genetics! (Stockholm, 1948) | Kestrels and Cerevisiae ::                                             Histories of Science from Kele W. Cable

While searching for information regarding Åke Gustafsson, a plant breeder who practiced mutagenesis (and cited by Stebbins as providing experimental data for mutation studies), I stumbled upon an amazing video: footage from the 8th International Congress in Genetics held in Stockholm in 1948! Bengt Bengtsson and Anna Tunlid of Lund University digitized and annotated the video (the host site), uploaded it to Youtube, and published an article in Genetics that usefully contextualizes the event, e…  »

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Compasswallah • Reading List #003: A Garden Of Stars

Below are some of the interesting articles that I came across while writing my monthly column The Compass Chronicles Vol. 5 for The Hindu BusinessLine. Here are Volume 4, Volume 3, Volume 2 and Volume 1. Links:   The Fall Of Shergotty (pdf), by Kevin Kinchka Mystery of the meteorite in Bihar’s opium fields, by Amitava Ghosh A survey of Bengali writings in science and technology (1800-1950) by various authors.  Introduction of Modern Astronomy In India during 18-19 centuries, (pdf) by S.M. Razau…  »

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Studienzentrum

Die Leopoldina – Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften ist die weltweit älteste Wissenschaftsakademie und hat die Aufgabe, Politik und Öffentlichkeit in gesellschaftlich relevanten Fragen zu beraten.

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Are these John Wilkes Booth’s field glasses? – O Say Can You See?

Curator Deborah Warner’s research on a valuable accessory may reveal a connection to President Abraham Lincoln’s assassin.  This intriguing object is the subject of much curatorial research Binocular field glasses were introduced in Vienna, Austria, around 1840 and soon caught the attention of those who would see things from afar. Although binocular opera glasses had been used since the 17th century, field glasses were a new style of large, rugged, and powerful binoculars designed for heavy d…  »

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

History of invention: Japanese prints showing the trials of Western inventors.

slate.com - Rebecca Onion
The Vault is Slate’s history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. The great project Public Domain Review recently posted about these prints, which are held at the Library of Congress. The series, credited to the Japanese Department of Education, represents the trials and tribulations of Western inventors and intellectuals. While the Library of Congress places their publication in the late 19th …  »

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Women in science, technology, engineering, math: History of advocacy from 1940-1980.

slate.com - Rebecca Onion
In researching the history of the Westinghouse Science Talent Search a few years ago, I happened upon some amazingly gender-stereotyped publicity photographs of young female contestants in the 1950s. The girls—who had jumped a rigorous series of academic hurdles on the way to the national science talent competition—had been photographed holding up banquet dresses, sharing milkshakes with male contestants, and gazing at the Hope Diamond on a visit to the Smithsonian. The official government line…  »

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

The Significance of Twins in Medieval and Early Modern Europe | The Wonder of Twins

This is a slightly expanded version of the paper I gave at the Annual Association for Medical Humanities Conference, University of Aberdeen, 8th – 10th July 2013. I have posted a review of the conference here. On giving this paper I attempted to access a past that is remote to me. I have, for the…

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

BBC – Podcasts and Downloads – In Our Time With Melvyn Bragg

Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the history of ideas – including topics drawn from philosophy, science, history,…

histscimedtech 21 July 2014

Charles Darwin’s evolutionary reading: HMS Beagle’s library goes online | Science | theguardian.com

theguardian.com - Nishad Karim
The Beagle’s library of more than 400 books has been reconstructed and made freely available in digital form The lost collection of books that kept Charles Darwin company aboard HMS Beagle and provided inspiration for his later works on evolution has been made publicly available for the first time today. Hundreds of titles that filled the shelves of the ship’s library on Darwin’s five-year circumnavigation of the globe in the 1830s have been brought together and made freely available through the  »

histscimedtech 20 July 2014

Happy Birthday Richard Owen | Fossil History

fossilhistory.wordpress.com - Fossil History
Happy 110th Birthday to Richard Owen!  Unfortunately I’m short on time so I can…  »

histscimedtech 20 July 2014

Tooth plaque provides unique insights into our prehistoric ancestors’ diet — ScienceDaily

An international team of researchers has found new evidence that our prehistoric ancestors had a detailed understanding of plants long before the development of agriculture. By extracting chemical compounds and microfossils from dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) from ancient teeth, the researchers were able to provide an entirely new perspective on our ancestors’ diets. Their research suggests that purple nut sedge (Cyperus rotundus) — today regarded as a nuisance weed — formed an imp…

histscimedtech 20 July 2014

Through time: the history behind your watch | British Museum blog

blog.britishmuseum.org - britishmuseumblog
David Thompson, former Curator of Horology, British Museum Do you own a watch? What does your watch look like? Is it a traditional mechanical watch made by one of the leading Swiss watch manufacturers or is it perhaps a cheap everyday item which you use just to tell the time? There is no doubt that even today, where smartphones have become a popular way of keeping time; watches are still very personal items. For many they are birthday, Christmas or anniversary presents. For others they have been  »

histscimedtech 20 July 2014

The $300,000 Drug

nytimes.com - By JOE NOCERA
Miracle cystic fibrosis treatment carries a heavy price.

histscimedtech 20 July 2014

The new science of blaming moms | MSNBC

Are we back to blaming moms in health research? Recent arguments make them responsible for children’s later-life diseases, behaviors, and emotions.

histscimedtech 19 July 2014

Immigrant scaremongering and hate: Conservatives stoke fears of diseased immigrant children.

slate.com - Jamelle Bouie
Since last October, the United States has caught tens of thousands of children crossing the border with Mexico, most fleeing violence in Central America. Thousands continue to come into the country, and President Obama has called the influx an “urgent humanitarian situation,” asking Congress for $3.7 billion in funding to deal with the children and families that have arrived. Complicating the problem are growing protests against the immigrants. “I’m protesting the invasion of the United States …  »

histscimedtech 19 July 2014

Mitochondria | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

All cells that have a nucleus, including plant, animal, fungal cells, and most single-celled protists, also have mitochondria. Mitochondria are particles called organelles found outside the nucleus in a cell’s cytoplasm. The main function of mitochondria is to supply energy to the cell, and therefore to the organism. The theory for how mitochondria evolved, proposed by Lynn Margulis in the twentieth century, is that they were once free-living organisms.

histscimedtech 19 July 2014

We Found Them! Pterodactyl models rediscovered

Close-up of an Oolite pterodactyl model in Crystal Palace Park. The date is only weeks before their destruction by vandals. Credit: Joe Cain 2005The lost

histscimedtech 19 July 2014

The H Word | Science | The Guardian

Rebekah Higgitt of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich and Vanessa Heggie at the University of Cambridge write about the untold history of science

histscimedtech 19 July 2014

The brain three ways.  From the top: Thomas…

The brain three ways.  From the top: Thomas Willis.  The anatomy of the brain and nerves.  Birmingham, Ala. : Classics of Neurology and Neurosurgery Library, 1983; 1664. Charles Bell.  The anatomy of the brain, explained in a series of engravings.  London: Printed by C. Whittingham, 1802. Jean Marc Bourgery.  Atlas of human anatomy.  Los Angeles: Taschen, [2005].  Originals published between 1831-1854.

histscimedtech 19 July 2014

Biography – OSLER, Sir WILLIAM – Volume XIV (1911-1920) – Dictionary of Canadian Biography

OSLER, Sir WILLIAM, physician, educator, medical philosopher, and historian; b. 12 July 1849 in Bond Head, Upper Canada, son of Featherstone Lake Osler*, a Church of England priest, and Ellen Free Pickton, both of Cornwall, England; m. 7 May 1892 Grace Linzee Revere, widow of Dr Samuel Weissell Gross, in Philadelphia, and they had two sons, one of whom survived infancy; d. 29 Dec. 1919 in Oxford, England.

histscimedtech 19 July 2014

Rickets returns: Whatever happened to cod liver oil?

Rickets, a disease caused by a lack of calcium and vitamin D that leads to softening of the bones and bone deformities is reportedly on the rise in the United States and elsewhere.

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

Digesting the Medical Past: Book Reviews

History of medicine book reviews by Ian Miller. Howard Chiang (ed.), Psychiatry and Chinese History. Barry Doyle, The Politics of Hospital Provision.

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

Benefit Street 1910: Delving into the Edwardian Eugenics Society’s Casebooks | CHPHMblog

A Cartoon by W.K. Hazeldon for the First International Eugenics Congress, 1912 …  »

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

Twitter / fadesingh: "Clockwork To Chaos": a new …

Connect with your friends — and other fascinating people. Get in-the-moment updates on the things that interest you. And watch events unfold, in real time, from every angle.

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

Writing in the Natural Sciences Unit (July 14-18) (with tweets) · normasalim · Storify

Some tweetchat about my experience teaching just such a unit, for the very first time. I try to combine #histsci and #scicomm

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

The Problem of Disenchantment: Now published | Heterodoxology

heterodoxology.com - easprem
I received exciting news this morning that my second book The Problem of Disenchantment: Scientific Naturalism and Esoteric Discourse, 1900-1939 is now officially published and available from Brill. Based on my PhD research it’s been a long time in the making (about 6 years), so it will be very satisfying to see the final hardbound […]

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

Fantastically Wrong: The Strange History of Using Organ-Shaped Plants to Treat Disease | Science | WIRED

It’s hard to imagine being the first human being to look at a plant like, say, a stinging nettle and think, “I probably shouldn’t eat this, on account of the general agony it would cause me. But what if I cooked it first?” So you prepare it and nervously drop it down your gullet—and luckily…

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

Wonder and the Ends of Inquiry | The Point Magazine

Science and wonder have a long and ambivalent relationship. Wonder is a spur to scientific inquiry but also a reproach and even an inhibition to inquiry. As philosophers never tire of repeating, only those…

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

The Institute of Sexology exhibition – in pictures | Art and design | theguardian.com

theguardian.com - Matt Fidler
The Wellcome Collection will relaunch in November with a major exhibition on sex, called The Institute of Sexology. Alongside sex toys and artefacts including anti-masturbation aids, the show will look at the science of pioneers such as Sigmund Freud, Marie Stopes and Alfred Kinsey. From instructions on repairing a diaphragm to erotic paintings, carvings and photographs, every conceivable aspect of human sexuality is explored. Warning, contains explicit images Maev Kennedy: Wellcome Collection  »

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

BBC News – Imperial War Museum London to reopen

A behind-the-scenes look of the London museum is provided after its £40m makeover to mark the centenary of World War One.

histscimedtech 18 July 2014

Panacea

Panacea is a blog about the history of medicine & history of surgery in early modern England by @medhistorian.

histscimedtech 18 July 2014