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The Bloodstoppers of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula | History in an HourHistory in an Hour

One winter’s evening in the late 1930s, in the town of Shingleton, a small logging community in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, or U.P., two local laborers, one by the name of Mike Bobic, the other George White, got into a knife … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 21 April 2014

The Future, 50 Years Ago | Leaping Robot Blog | Patrick McCray

patrickmccray.com - Patrick McCray
Last week, the Pew Research Center released a report that surveyed Americans’ attitudes about technology and their thoughts about what technological advances would happen in the next half-century. I’ll be writing something about the report itself later – suffice it to say for now that Americans’ views of the technological future are remarkably static. But Pew’s report was quite timely because, 50 years ago, the New York World’s Fair opened. The juxtaposition, while surely accidental, prompted me  »

histscimedtech 18 April 2014

The Day Albert Einstein Died: A Photographer’s Story | LIFE.com

Pictures from a spring day in 1955, when photographer Ralph Morse raced around New Jersey in search of the late, great Albert Einstein.

histscimedtech 18 April 2014

Hungary’s cold war with polio | Mosaic

Trapped by the Cold War and scarred after a failed revolution, Hungary fought one of its greatest battles against polio. Penny Bailey reports.

histscimedtech 18 April 2014

Your Penis Is Getting in the Way of My Science

io9.com - Annalee Newitz
Earlier today, scientists announced they’d discovered an insect with a new kind of female sex organ. It looks a bit like a penis, and is called a gynosome. But almost every news outlet covered the story by describing the insects as "females with penises." This isn’t just painfully wrong — it’s bad for science. Read more…

histscimedtech 18 April 2014

One of the World’s First Statements About the Scientific Method

io9.com - Annalee Newitz
Sometimes it’s a good idea to remember the wisdom of the ancients, especially when they are criticizing the wisdom of the ancients. Read more…

histscimedtech 18 April 2014

Social History Society Conference | George Campbell Gosling

As I write this, I’m sat with a little bottle of pink lemonade on the platform at York Station, heading home from the Social History Society’s annual conference. This year’s conference, held at the University of Northumbria in central Newcastle, was my first – but hopefully not my last. It is a sign of just how big and busy a conference it is that I’d only said the briefest of hellos to some of the twitterstorians I had hoped to spend some time meeting or catching up with. If you’re one of thos…  »

histscimedtech 18 April 2014

Cosmos, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and Bruno | Darin Hayton

By now it seems clear: Neil deGrasse Tyson and Cosmos got Bruno wrong.[1] People have pointed out, and out, and out, and out, and out the various errors.[2] Meg Rosenburg starts to move the discussion beyond the errors by offering a bit more about Bruno. In her post Becky Ferreira adds still more detail. But as the comments to all these posts suggest, the vast majority of readers (at least those who bother to leave comments)[3] don’t care that Cosmos got it wrong—a disturbing number seem to def…  »

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Current Exhibition – Two Temple Place

Two Temple Place, one of London’s hidden architectural gems, hosts exhibitions and events and is owned by the charity The Bulldog Trust.

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Severe Scurvy Struck Christopher Columbus’s Crew

Despite being surrounded by tropical fruits in the New World, the sailors of Columbus’s second trip had severe scurvy.

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Chronologia Universalis | Blog of a three-year research project "Calendars and chronology in the intellectual culture of Central Europe, 1400-1700". Project funded by the Polish National Science Cent…

Blog of a three-year research project "Calendars and chronology in the intellectual culture of Central Europe, 1400-1700". Project funded by the Polish National Science Centre within the FUGA programme for postdoctoral fellows and carried out at the Faculty of "Artes Liberales" of the University of Warsaw (by Michal Choptiany)

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Sounds Made Up: (True) Tales From the History of Science Tickets in Philadelphia, PA, United States

Join local comedians and historians of science for a journey back in time. Take a lighthearted look at times when our best scientific intentions resulted in unexpected outcomes.

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Alchemy’s Rainbow: Pigment Science and the Art of Conservation | Chemical Heritage Foundation

Join us for a live broadcast discussion with art conservator Mark F. Bockrath and art historian Elisabeth Berry Drago.

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

The Sir Hans Sloane Birthday Collection: Giants’ Shoulders #70 | The Sloane Letters Blog

sloaneletters.com - Lisa Smith
Sir Hans Sloane, collector and physician, was born on 16 April 1660. To celebrate his 354th birthday, I’m hosting the history of science carnival: Giants’ Shoulders #70. Sloane collected stuff of all kinds, from curiosities (natural and man-made) and botanical samples to manuscripts. He was very thorough… So what does one give the man who […]

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

What ‘Cosmos’ Got Wrong About Thales of Miletus, the World’s First Scientist | Motherboard

It’s amazing that Thales kicked the gods out of natural philosophy. But it is not his most important contribution to science.

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

The Problems of an Eighteenth-Century Menagerie | NiCHE

niche-canada.org - NiCHE Canada
by Lisa Smith. Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753) was a famous physician and well-known collector, whose collections became the core of the British Museum (founded in 1753). The online database of Sloane’s Correspondence presents research from the lives of Sloane and his patients, making his large correspondence more searchable for details of early modern trade and collecting, medical case histories, and scientific networks. Over at The Sloane Letters Blog (www.sloaneletters.com), Lisa Smith shares cu…  »

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

What the Show Cosmos Gets Wrong about Religion—and Science | Religion & Politics

religionandpolitics.org - Elizabeth Yale
(Photo by Frank Micelotta/Invision for FOX/AP Images) In its third episode, titled “When Knowledge Conquered Fear,” the new Cosmos reboot, hosted by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, tells the story of the discovery and publication of Isaac Newton’s laws of motion. Almost three centuries after Newton’s death, these laws, which offer a unified framework for calculating and predicting the movement of a projectile on earth as well as the planets in the heavens, remain a fundamental contribution …  »

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Mermaids in a medical museum? | Wellcome Collection blog

blog.wellcomecollection.org - Russell Dornan
It’s apt that this post should follow our recent one about unicorns. From an earthbound mythological creature to one which lived in the sea, this post is all about mermaids. But not as you might expect… Paolo Viscardi, co-author of Mermaids Uncovered, a new article in the Journal of Museum Ethnography on the history of mermaids, tells us about Henry Wellcome’s connection to these legendary aquatic beings. On the surface, there may not seem to be many obvious overlaps between mermaids and medi…  »

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Registration for the 2014 BSHS Annual Conference is now open | The British Society for the History of Science (BSHS)

bshs.org.uk - bshs-admin
Registration for the 2014 BSHS Annual Conference is now open. Please read the relevant information below, then click here to go to the registration page. Programme. All advance versions of the conference programme should be treated as provisional: the Society reserves the right to change any aspect of the programme and other arrangements where good reason calls for this to be done. Please note, in particular, that in the event of speaker cancellations, we may change timings (including dates) for  »

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Re-Picturing Photographic History | The Getty Iris

The Iris is the Getty’s online magazine. Launched in April 2010, it is written by the staff, volunteers, scholars, interns, and others at the Getty’s two Los Angeles campuses—the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Malibu—and around the world.

histscimedtech 17 April 2014

Robert Mitchell, “Experimental Life: Vitalism in Romantic Science and Literature” (Johns Hopkins UP, 2013)

newbooksinscitechsoc.com - New Books Network
Robert Mitchell’s new book is wonderfully situated across several intersections: of history and literature, of the Romantic and contemporary worlds, of Keats’ urn and a laboratory cylinder full of dry ice. In Experimental Life: Vitalism in Romantic Science and Literature (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013), Mitchell argues that we are in the midst of a vitalist turn in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, and that this is only the latest in a series of eras of what he calls…  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

"Cellular death in morphogenesis of the avian wing" (1962), by John W. Saunders Jr., et al. | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

In the early 1960s, John W. Saunders Jr., Mary T. Gasseling, and Lilyan C. Saunders in the US investigated how cells die in the developing limbs of chick embryos. They studied when and where in developing limbs many cells die, and they studied the functions of cell death in wing development.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

‘Search until you find a passion and go all out to excel in its expression’ | Harvard Gazette

Experience is a series of interviews with Harvard faculty covering the reasons they became teachers and scholars, and the personal journeys, missteps included, behind their professional success. First up is E.O. Wilson, one of the most accomplished biologists of the past century. Interviews with Melissa Franklin, Martha Minow, Stephen Greenblatt, Sarah Lawrence-Lightfoot, Steven Pinker, Laurel Ulrich, Helen Vendler, and Walter Willett will appear in coming weeks. Edward O. Wilson, the Pellegrino  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

The Cullen Project – Glasgow, United Kingdom – College & University | Facebook

The Cullen Project, Glasgow, United Kingdom. 40 likes · 6 talking about this. ‘The Cullen Project’: AHRC-funded collaboration between Glasgow University School of Critical Studies and the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

New Isis: Organizational Revolution and the Human Sciences, Neurohistory, & More | Advances in the History of Psychology

ahp.apps01.yorku.ca - Jacy Young
The March 2014 issue of Isis, the official journal of the History of Science Society, is now online. Included in this issue are a number of items of interest to AHP readers, including a special Focus section on Neurohistory. Full titles, authors, and abstracts follow below. “The Organizational Revolution and the Human Sciences,” by Hunter Heyck. The abstract reads, This essay argues that a new way of understanding science and nature emerged and flourished in the human sciences in America between  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

Abstracts | Buildings & the Body Symposium

Session 1: Narratives and Biographies of Buildings Long Papers Richard Newman - Archaeological Site Director, Cambridge Archaeology Unit, University of Cambridge The School of Pythagorus, Cambridge: the biography of a later 12th century townhouse The School of Pythagoras in Cambridge represents the rare survival of a substantial late 12th century masonry townhouse. Elucidated by the results…

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

King’s College London – History of Health & Medicine annual lecture History of Health & Medicine annual lecture

The History of Health & Medicine annual lecture 2014 will be given by Warwick Anderson, University of Sydney.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

Yesterday’s drugs are tomorrow’s medicines – Benjamin Breen – Aeon

aeon.co - Benjamin Breen
My sister is a witch. Or, more precisely, a Wiccan astrologer and tarot reader. Growing up as a kid who worshipped Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking, I found it hard to square her worldview with my own. But that didn’t stop me from feeling a thrill when I visited her shabbily ornate, mist-clad Victorian house […] The post Under the influence appeared first on Aeon Magazine.

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

The History of the Future: a Reading List | Longreads

blog.longreads.com - Julia Wick
Below is a guest reading list from Daniel A. Gross, journalist-in-residence at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. He also writes and produces radio about the lives of stuff and the stuff of life. *** Journalism has been called the first draft of history. Here are 5 technology stories that belong in the second draft. Like a lot of technology journalism, they’re each focused on an emerging future, which at times makes them a bit breathless with excitement. But unlike m…  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

More Medical Recipes from Thomas Scattergood’s Diaries | Darin Hayton

Thomas Scattergood copied a number of recipes into one of his later diaries, one that dates from just after the turn of the century. Many of these recipes he took from “the Countess of Kent.” Shortly after Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent, died, a book of her medical recipes were collected and published in two versions: A choice manual of rare and select secrets in physick and chyrurgery collected and practised by the Right Honorable, the Countesse of Kent, late deceased ; as also most exquisite  »

histscimedtech 16 April 2014

Ptak Science Books: Before "Cosmos" 2012 there was "Cosmos" 1845

JF Ptak Science Books Post 1577 Before the Neil deGrasse Tyson version and update of Carl Sagan’s landmark tlevision series, Cosmos, there was Alexander von Humboldt, and his enormously influential book of the same title, printed in 1845-1862. Well, von…

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

Casebooks, photographs, and institutional intimacy | The Other Asylum…

seastoe.wordpress.com - stef eastoe
I have recently been trawling through the mammoth, dusty, fragile patient casebooks of Caterham. I have numerous images of them saved on my pc, but missed having the dirt, the grime, and the feeling of the pages under my fingers. I also found that flipping through the pages physically allowed me to see was contained within the casebooks beyond that of brief notes as to their health, qualitative information which is hidden, or less evident when I scroll through them on my computer screen. So the…  »

histscimedtech 15 April 2014

When Physicians Give Up: Anna Maria Luisa de’ Medici’s Infant Convulsion Powder | The Recipes Project

recipes.hypotheses.org - Ashley Buchanan
By Ashley Buchanan On July 19, 1736, Baroness Massimilianna Moltke wrote Anna Maria Luisa, the Electress Palatine and last Medici princess, to thank her for sending a “miraculous powder” to treat infant convulsions, or “male caduco.” In the letter sent from … Continue reading →

histscimedtech 15 April 2014