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Norman Ramsey and his method

While searching for a way to boost the resolution of an atomic spectrometer, Ramsey hit on a simple solution: Replace a single oscillating magnetic field with two separated ones.

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

Robert Geoffrey Edwards’s Study of in vitro Mammalian Oocyte Maturation, 1960 to 1965 | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

In a series of experiments between 1960 and 1965, Robert Geoffrey Edwards discovered how to make mammalian egg cells, or oocytes, mature outside of a female’s body. Edwards, working at several research institutions in the UK during this period, studied in vitro fertilization (IVF) methods.

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

Cambridge Journals Online – The British Journal for the History of Science – Abstract – Catholics, science and civic culture in Victorian Belfast

The connections between science and civic culture in the Victorian period have been extensively, and intensively, investigated over the past several decades. Limited attention, however, has been paid to Irish urban contexts. Roman Catholic attitudes towards science in the nineteenth century have also been neglected beyond a rather restricted set of thinkers and topics. This paper is offered as a contribution to addressing these lacunae, and examines in detail the complexities involved in Cathol…

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

Blistering Barnacles – by post! | Natural Selections

darwinproject.ac.uk - DarwinLetters
Anelasma squalicola – note small cirri & root-like filaments (from fig. 2 & 3, Pl. IV, Cirripedia by Charles Darwin. Source: Biodiversity Heritage Library/MBLWHOI Library) The Natural History Museum of Denmark has just discovered a collection of barnacles sent by Charles Darwin to Japetus Steenstrup in 1854 as a thank you gift – a “very inadequate return” (Letter 1589, 7 Sept [1854]) – for the many cirripede specimens that Steenstrup had sent him. Among these was one which turned out to be of t…  »

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

Theodore Dreiser’s "Laughing Gas". [Anesth Analg. 1989] – PubMed – NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier | Chemical Heritage Foundation

Lavoisier, a meticulous experimenter, revolutionized chemistry by establishing the law of conservation of mass, determining that combustion and respiration are caused by chemical reactions with what he named “oxygen,” and helping systematize chemical nomenclature, among many other accomplishments.

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

The Study of Nature as Devotional Practice | jamescungureanu

jamescungureanu.wordpress.com - jamescungureanu
In the Winter issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Peter Harrison considers the “Sentiments of Devotion and Experimental Philosophy in Seventeenth-Century England” (2014). In particular, he focuses on the sentiments of chemist, physicist, and natural philosopher, Robert Boyle (1627-1691). In his Disquisition concerning the Final Causes of Natural Things (1688), Boyle argued that studying nature will excite “true Sentiments both of Devotion and of particular Vertues.” That …  »

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

I am not a Vessel: Ireland’s Reproductive Rights | Nursing Clio

nursingclio.org - Helen McBride
by Helen McBride In a strangely prophetic report, the United Nations (UN) committee that monitors states’ compliance with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights warned Ireland last month that its poor record on gender equality and on-going human rights injustices certainly would result in continued human rights abuses if strong measures to remedy this were not taken. Then, just last week, a case emerged that demonstrates how considerable these reproductive rights violations can  »

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

More Ugly Manuscripts, including Palimpsests | Medicine, ancient and modern

Since writing my latest post (an insanely long time ago!), I delved into more ugly manuscripts and… I even found uglier specimens than the ones I commented on in that post… In fact, all I have been working on is pretty ugly. And yet it’s fascinating stuff! So I thought ‘Ugly Manuscripts’ deserved a ‘follow up’ post, even though I originally planned to write on totally different things, such as ancient prognostic, recent publications on ancient medicine, and the distant link between Galen and yo…  »

histscimedtech 27 August 2014

Hwang Woo-suk’s Use of Human Eggs for Research 2002-2005 | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Hwang Woo-suk, a geneticist in South Korea, claimed in Science magazine in 2004 and 2005 that he and a team of researchers had for the first time cloned a human embryo and that they had derived eleven stem cell lines from it. Hwang was a professor at Seoul National University in Seoul, South Korea. In the Science articles, Hwang stated that all of the women who donated eggs to his laboratory were volunteers who donated their eggs (oocytes) without receiving any compensation in return. In 2006, …

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

American journal of roentgenology : American Roentgen Ray Society : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

Official organ of the American Roentgen Ray Society, and, Mar.1921-1922 of the American Radium Society

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

Oral History Transcript — Dr. James Franck and Hertha Sponer-Franck

Oral history interviews with leading scientists (including transcripts and voice clips) from the Center for History of Physics and the Niels Bohr Library & Archives at the American Institute of Physics

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

Isaac Newton is calling you… – Science blog

britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk - The Science Team
Rachel Huddart takes a call from one of history’s most famous scientists. Visitors to the British Library will have probably seen the statue of Isaac Newton crouched over the piazza. Newton has been part of the Library since we opened in St Pancras in 1997 but has always stayed pretty…

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

Raphael Scholl – Blog – Grue-some confusion

raphaelscholl.org - Raphael Scholl
Having concluded at the end of my previous post that the study of statistics has helped me to appreciate the value of the philosophy of science, it is only fitting to point to an instance of the reverse: Statistics can be a resource for solving philosophical problems. Nelson Goodman’s new riddle of induction is supposed to show that no purely syntactical theory of confirmation is possible (i.e. one that does not depend on the meaning of the terms that appear in the argument, like “raven” or “bl…  »

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

Call for Papers | The Travellers’ Tails Seminars: Exploration | Enfilade

George Stubbs, Portrait of the Kongouro (Kangaroo) from New Holland, 1772 (National Maritime Museum) ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊ From the Call for Papers: The Travellers’ Tails Seminars: Exploration National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, Four Thursdays,  9 October 2014 — 29 January 2015 Proposals due by 5 September 2014 The Art Fund and Heritage Lottery Fund…

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

John Tyndall: written back into the history of magnetism | The Royal Institution: Science Lives Here

rigb.org - Royal Institition
John Tyndall’s crucial work on magnetism has been all but written out of the history books. Roland Jackson puts the record straight.

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

The first lumbar puncture. [J Hist Neurosci. 1997] – PubMed – NCBI

PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

The Origin of Humans Is Surprisingly Complicated – Scientific American

Many kinds of archaic humans walked the planet at the same time. How did Homo sapiens come to be the last species standing? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

histscimedtech 26 August 2014

Disciplining physicians: frauds, quackery, and Miracle Whirling Spray | Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Part of the role of the College has always been to regulate the medical profession, to discipline minor infractions and work to keep out the unscrupulous and unethical – by fining them, removing their College membership, and even pursuing them through the courts at our own expense.  Occasionally the College would employ our own private detectives to hunt down particularly difficult individuals.

histscimedtech 25 August 2014

The NACA Centenary: 100 Years of Aerospace Research and Development | NASA

The National Air and Space Museum and NASA History are inviting proposals for papers to a special symposium commemorating a century of aerospace R&D.

histscimedtech 25 August 2014

Alberta’s cloud-seeding pilots see 2nd busiest year in 20 years – Calgary – CBC News

Fighting hailstorms in Alberta is getting a whole lot busier, according to the people behind the Alberta Hail Suppression Project, which uses planes to fly into storms and seed clouds in order to lessen the damage caused by hail.

histscimedtech 25 August 2014

Wallifaction / The New Martyrs of Science

Among historical bloggers, there’s no shortage of complaints lately about the idea of “martyrs of science”, a term applied to those who sacrifice their lives for the cause of scientific knowledge. Historians have attacked this idea with a renewed sense of urgency since Neil deGrasse Tyson’s Cosmos reboot premiered in March. The first episode of Cosmos relates the classic tale of the “martyrdom” of heretical priest and quasi-Copernican Giordano Bruno at the hands of the Roman Inquisition. Indeed,  »

histscimedtech 25 August 2014

Conch Shell Antique Ear Trumpet – Phisick | Medical Antiques

A wunderkammer of antique medical, surgical and dental instruments. Photographs and related articles illuminate a history of medicine within a searchable database. For doctors, historians, collectors or the curious casual browser.

histscimedtech 25 August 2014

Phrenology, the Origins of Scientific Naturalism, and Herbert Spencer’s “Religion of the Heart” | jamescungureanu

jamescungureanu.wordpress.com - jamescungureanu
Over the weekend I came across several interconnecting books and themes. The first was John van Wyhe’s excellent Phrenology and the Origins of Victorian Scientific Naturalism (2004), which traces the origins of scientific naturalism back to British phrenology. In this book Wyhe takes the “social interests” approach, resting on the “common-sense assumption,” he writes in his introduction, “that people are disposed to like or dislike, to adopt or reject ideas according to their coherence or usefu…  »

histscimedtech 24 August 2014

Could the flu pandemic of 1918 really have started in Spain? | In English | EL PAÍS

Investigation suggests that a deadly version of the virus, which killed more than 50 million, may have gestated in Madrid

histscimedtech 24 August 2014

Georges Cuvier (1769-1832) | The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

Georges Cuvier, baptized Georges Jean-Léopold Nicolas-Frédéric Cuvier, was a professor of anatomy at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, France, through the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Scholars recognize Cuvier as a founder of modern comparative anatomy, and as an important contributor to vertebrate paleontology and geology.

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Hello – Radiolab

It’s tough to make small talk with a stranger—especially when that stranger doesn’t speak your language. (And he has a blowhole.)

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Eavesdropping Ep17: What’s A Scientific Theory? by Sententias on SoundCloud – Hear the world’s sounds

Listen to Eavesdropping Ep17: What’s A Scientific Theory? by Sententias: Too often scientific theories aren’t really understood and are downgraded from their rightful status in science. "It’s just a theory" is … | Explore the largest community of artists, bands, podcasters and creators of music & audio.

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Panacea: The Pox: Syphilis, Stigma & Shame

medhistorian.com - Samantha Sandassie
“A pox on both your houses!” or so goes the popular (mis)quotation from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.[1] Whether called the pox, the French disease or morbus gallicus, the Spanish sickness or the Spanish itch, the evil of Naples or the Neapolitan disease, or very simply the venereal infection, syphilis and other sexually transmitted infections plagued the early modern European people.[2] Indeed, venereal diseases were so widespread, devastating, and stigmatized that people sought to name …  »

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Support Lindsey Fitzharris creating MORBID BLOG CONTENT!

Patreon is empowering a new generation of creators. Support and engage with artists and creators as they live out their passions!

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Linda Hall Library

Based in Kansas City, MO, the Linda Hall Library is the nation’s largest independent research library devoted to the support of research and scholarship in the fields of science, engineering, and…

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Redressing the Balance: Levinus Vincent’s Wonder Theatre of Nature | The Public Domain Review

publicdomainreview.org - Adam Green
Bert van de Roemer explores the curiosity cabinets of the Dutch collector Levinus Vincent and how the aesthetic drive behind his meticulous ordering of the contents was in essence religious, an attempt to emphasise the wonder of God’s creations by restoring the natural world to its prelapsarian harmony.

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Third Pre-Print Article from Psychical Research Special Issue: “Haunted Thoughts of the Careful Experimentalist”, by Richard Noakes | Forbidden Histories

A pre-print version of Richard Noakes’ thought-provoking article looking at the complex relationship between unorthodox and established sciences is now available for download on the website of Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences. HAUNTED THOUGHTS OF THE CAREFUL EXPERIMENTALIST: PSYCHICAL RESEARCH AND THE TROUBLES OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Richard Noakes, University of Exeter Abstract This paper analyses the relationship between the ‘elusive’ science of psychic…  »

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Learn The History Of Physics In 4 Minutes | Co.Design | business + design

Physics may be an esoteric concept, but this charmingly illustrated video will get you through a few hundred years of scientific discovery.

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

No, the first baby born under anaesthesia wasn’t named Anaesthesia

According to a recent post that’s gone viral among science and history nerds, the first baby born to a mother under anaesthesia named her baby Anaesthesia. It’s an amusing fun fact. But unfortunately, it’s too good to be true. Anaesthesia was reportedly a nickname sometimes used by the doctor who delivered the baby girl in 1847, but her real name was Wilhelmina.

histscimedtech 23 August 2014

Yale University Medical Library’s Cushing Center shows more than brain collections; it also reveals medicine’s humanism.

slate.com - Elizabeth Simmons
This article originally appeared in Inside Higher Ed. “Would you like to see the brain collection?” my guide asked, as we finished our tour of the Yale School of Medicine. What scientist could resist? I was expecting an impersonal chamber crammed with specimens and devices. Perhaps a brightly lit, crowded, antiseptic room, like the research bays we had just been exploring. Or an old-fashioned version, resembling an untidy apothecary’s shop packed with mysterious jars.  But when we entered the C…  »

histscimedtech 22 August 2014